The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience

J. A. Puma, Jr Sketch, J. E. Tcheng, L. H. Gardner, C. L. Nelson, H. R. Phillips, R. S. Stack, R. M. Califf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine the natural history of patients with a total occlusion of a single coronary artery, we searched the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease to find all patients who underwent a first coronary angiogram >2 days after a symptomatic myocardial infarction between 1969 and 1994. Patients who underwent angiography >30 days after the acute event had a low risk of death in the first year (3%), and a proximal left anterior descending coronary occlusion did not confer substantially higher risk of death (4%). Patients undergoing angiography <30 days after the acute event had a higher mortality (5%), especially those with proximal left anterior descending occlusion (10%). The time from the acute event to angiography was a predictor of death (p= 0.04). Despite low 1-year mortality rates, patients with total occlusion of an isolated coronary vessel treated medically had substantial mortality, myocardial infarction, and revascularization rates over a long-term follow- up period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-399
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume133
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Puma, J. A., Sketch, J., Tcheng, J. E., Gardner, L. H., Nelson, C. L., Phillips, H. R., Stack, R. S., & Califf, R. M. (1997). The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience. American Heart Journal, 133(4), 393-399. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-8703(97)70179-0