The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience

J. A. Puma, Jr Sketch M.H., J. E. Tcheng, L. H. Gardner, C. L. Nelson, H. R. Phillips, R. S. Stack, R. M. Califf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the natural history of patients with a total occlusion of a single coronary artery, we searched the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease to find all patients who underwent a first coronary angiogram >2 days after a symptomatic myocardial infarction between 1969 and 1994. Patients who underwent angiography >30 days after the acute event had a low risk of death in the first year (3%), and a proximal left anterior descending coronary occlusion did not confer substantially higher risk of death (4%). Patients undergoing angiography <30 days after the acute event had a higher mortality (5%), especially those with proximal left anterior descending occlusion (10%). The time from the acute event to angiography was a predictor of death (p= 0.04). Despite low 1-year mortality rates, patients with total occlusion of an isolated coronary vessel treated medically had substantial mortality, myocardial infarction, and revascularization rates over a long-term follow- up period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-399
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume133
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Coronary Occlusion
Natural History
Angiography
Mortality
Coronary Vessels
Myocardial Infarction
Myocardial Revascularization
Cardiovascular Diseases
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Puma, J. A., Sketch M.H., J., Tcheng, J. E., Gardner, L. H., Nelson, C. L., Phillips, H. R., ... Califf, R. M. (1997). The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience. American Heart Journal, 133(4), 393-399.

The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion : A 25- year experience. / Puma, J. A.; Sketch M.H., Jr; Tcheng, J. E.; Gardner, L. H.; Nelson, C. L.; Phillips, H. R.; Stack, R. S.; Califf, R. M.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 133, No. 4, 01.01.1997, p. 393-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Puma, JA, Sketch M.H., J, Tcheng, JE, Gardner, LH, Nelson, CL, Phillips, HR, Stack, RS & Califf, RM 1997, 'The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience', American Heart Journal, vol. 133, no. 4, pp. 393-399.
Puma JA, Sketch M.H. J, Tcheng JE, Gardner LH, Nelson CL, Phillips HR et al. The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion: A 25- year experience. American Heart Journal. 1997 Jan 1;133(4):393-399.
Puma, J. A. ; Sketch M.H., Jr ; Tcheng, J. E. ; Gardner, L. H. ; Nelson, C. L. ; Phillips, H. R. ; Stack, R. S. ; Califf, R. M. / The natural history of single-vessel chronic coronary occlusion : A 25- year experience. In: American Heart Journal. 1997 ; Vol. 133, No. 4. pp. 393-399.
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