The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation

Roberto J. Firpi, Virginia Clark, Consuelo Soldevila-Pico, Giuseppe Morelli, Roniel Cabrera, Cynthia Levy, Victor I. Machicao, Chen Chaoru, David R. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis C after liver transplantation leads to graft cirrhosis in up to 30% of patients within 5 years, but limited data exist regarding the clinical course of cirrhosis after transplantation. The aims of this study were to report the natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation and to identify risk factors for decompensation and survival. Hepatitis C patients underwent protocol liver biopsies yearly after liver transplantation. After cirrhosis was identified by biopsy, the outcomes of interest were the development of decompensation, death, or retransplantation for hepatitis C. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis was used to determine survival and risk factors for decompensation and mortality. Out of 502 liver transplants performed for hepatitis C, 88 patients (18%) had cirrhosis within 3.7 years. Seventy-one patients were compensated at diagnosis. The cumulative probability of decompensation 1 year after cirrhosis was 30%. A Model for End-Stage Liver disease score ≥ 16 was predictive of decompensation and poor survival, whereas successful interferon treatment was found to reduce this risk (relative risk = 0.05). Once decompensation occurred, 1-year survival was 46%. In conclusion, the results confirm an accelerated natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation and demonstrate poor survival after decompensation. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease can stratify risk for decompensation and survival, whereas successful antiviral therapy may be protective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1063-1071
Number of pages9
JournalLiver Transplantation
Volume15
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis C
Liver Transplantation
Fibrosis
Survival
End Stage Liver Disease
Transplants
Biopsy
Liver
Interferons
Antiviral Agents
Transplantation
Regression Analysis
Mortality
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation
  • Hepatology

Cite this

Firpi, R. J., Clark, V., Soldevila-Pico, C., Morelli, G., Cabrera, R., Levy, C., ... Nelson, D. R. (2009). The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation. Liver Transplantation, 15(9), 1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1002/lt.21784

The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation. / Firpi, Roberto J.; Clark, Virginia; Soldevila-Pico, Consuelo; Morelli, Giuseppe; Cabrera, Roniel; Levy, Cynthia; Machicao, Victor I.; Chaoru, Chen; Nelson, David R.

In: Liver Transplantation, Vol. 15, No. 9, 01.01.2009, p. 1063-1071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Firpi, RJ, Clark, V, Soldevila-Pico, C, Morelli, G, Cabrera, R, Levy, C, Machicao, VI, Chaoru, C & Nelson, DR 2009, 'The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation', Liver Transplantation, vol. 15, no. 9, pp. 1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1002/lt.21784
Firpi RJ, Clark V, Soldevila-Pico C, Morelli G, Cabrera R, Levy C et al. The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation. Liver Transplantation. 2009 Jan 1;15(9):1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1002/lt.21784
Firpi, Roberto J. ; Clark, Virginia ; Soldevila-Pico, Consuelo ; Morelli, Giuseppe ; Cabrera, Roniel ; Levy, Cynthia ; Machicao, Victor I. ; Chaoru, Chen ; Nelson, David R. / The natural history of hepatitis C cirrhosis after liver transplantation. In: Liver Transplantation. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 9. pp. 1063-1071.
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