The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance

The Northern Manhattan Study

Julio R. Vieira, Mitchell S V Elkind, Yeseon Park Moon, Tatjana Rundek, Bernadette Boden-Albala, Myunghee C. Paik, Ralph L Sacco, Clinton B Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for diabetes, stroke, myocardial infarction, and increased mortality, and has been associated with cognition in some populations. We hypothesized that MetS would be associated with lower Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores in a multi-ethnic population, and that MetS is a better predictor of cognition than its individual components or diabetes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 3,150 stroke-free participants. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Linear regression and polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between MMSE score and MetS, its individual components, diabetes, and inflammatory biomarkers. Results: MetS was inversely associated with MMSE score (unadjusted β = -0.67; 95% CI -0.92, -0.41). Adjusting for potential confounders, MetS was associated with lower MMSE score (adjusted β = -0.24; 95% CI -0.47, -0.01), but its individual components and diabetes were not. Those with MetS were more likely to have an MMSE score of <18 than a score of ≥24 (adjusted OR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.26, 3.01). There was an interaction between MetS and race-ethnicity, such that MetS was associated with lower MMSE score among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics but not non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: MetS was associated with lower cognition in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of the effect of MetS on cognition are warranted, and should account for demographic differences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-159
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroepidemiology
Volume37
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

Cognition
Stroke
Population
Hispanic Americans
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
Myocardial Infarction
Cholesterol
Demography
Guidelines
Education
Mortality
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular disorders
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Cognitive performance
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Vascular cognitive impairment
  • Vascular dementia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Vieira, J. R., Elkind, M. S. V., Moon, Y. P., Rundek, T., Boden-Albala, B., Paik, M. C., ... Wright, C. B. (2011). The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance: The Northern Manhattan Study. Neuroepidemiology, 37(3-4), 153-159. https://doi.org/10.1159/000332208

The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance : The Northern Manhattan Study. / Vieira, Julio R.; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Moon, Yeseon Park; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B.

In: Neuroepidemiology, Vol. 37, No. 3-4, 01.12.2011, p. 153-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vieira, JR, Elkind, MSV, Moon, YP, Rundek, T, Boden-Albala, B, Paik, MC, Sacco, RL & Wright, CB 2011, 'The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance: The Northern Manhattan Study', Neuroepidemiology, vol. 37, no. 3-4, pp. 153-159. https://doi.org/10.1159/000332208
Vieira JR, Elkind MSV, Moon YP, Rundek T, Boden-Albala B, Paik MC et al. The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance: The Northern Manhattan Study. Neuroepidemiology. 2011 Dec 1;37(3-4):153-159. https://doi.org/10.1159/000332208
Vieira, Julio R. ; Elkind, Mitchell S V ; Moon, Yeseon Park ; Rundek, Tatjana ; Boden-Albala, Bernadette ; Paik, Myunghee C. ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Wright, Clinton B. / The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance : The Northern Manhattan Study. In: Neuroepidemiology. 2011 ; Vol. 37, No. 3-4. pp. 153-159.
@article{b07c47f7ce2a46e095e0ebd5e2a20932,
title = "The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance: The Northern Manhattan Study",
abstract = "Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for diabetes, stroke, myocardial infarction, and increased mortality, and has been associated with cognition in some populations. We hypothesized that MetS would be associated with lower Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores in a multi-ethnic population, and that MetS is a better predictor of cognition than its individual components or diabetes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 3,150 stroke-free participants. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Linear regression and polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between MMSE score and MetS, its individual components, diabetes, and inflammatory biomarkers. Results: MetS was inversely associated with MMSE score (unadjusted β = -0.67; 95{\%} CI -0.92, -0.41). Adjusting for potential confounders, MetS was associated with lower MMSE score (adjusted β = -0.24; 95{\%} CI -0.47, -0.01), but its individual components and diabetes were not. Those with MetS were more likely to have an MMSE score of <18 than a score of ≥24 (adjusted OR = 1.94; 95{\%} CI 1.26, 3.01). There was an interaction between MetS and race-ethnicity, such that MetS was associated with lower MMSE score among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics but not non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: MetS was associated with lower cognition in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of the effect of MetS on cognition are warranted, and should account for demographic differences.",
keywords = "Cerebrovascular disorders, Cognitive impairment, Cognitive performance, Metabolic syndrome, Vascular cognitive impairment, Vascular dementia",
author = "Vieira, {Julio R.} and Elkind, {Mitchell S V} and Moon, {Yeseon Park} and Tatjana Rundek and Bernadette Boden-Albala and Paik, {Myunghee C.} and Sacco, {Ralph L} and Wright, {Clinton B}",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1159/000332208",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "153--159",
journal = "Neuroepidemiology",
issn = "0251-5350",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",
number = "3-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The metabolic syndrome and cognitive performance

T2 - The Northern Manhattan Study

AU - Vieira, Julio R.

AU - Elkind, Mitchell S V

AU - Moon, Yeseon Park

AU - Rundek, Tatjana

AU - Boden-Albala, Bernadette

AU - Paik, Myunghee C.

AU - Sacco, Ralph L

AU - Wright, Clinton B

PY - 2011/12/1

Y1 - 2011/12/1

N2 - Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for diabetes, stroke, myocardial infarction, and increased mortality, and has been associated with cognition in some populations. We hypothesized that MetS would be associated with lower Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores in a multi-ethnic population, and that MetS is a better predictor of cognition than its individual components or diabetes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 3,150 stroke-free participants. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Linear regression and polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between MMSE score and MetS, its individual components, diabetes, and inflammatory biomarkers. Results: MetS was inversely associated with MMSE score (unadjusted β = -0.67; 95% CI -0.92, -0.41). Adjusting for potential confounders, MetS was associated with lower MMSE score (adjusted β = -0.24; 95% CI -0.47, -0.01), but its individual components and diabetes were not. Those with MetS were more likely to have an MMSE score of <18 than a score of ≥24 (adjusted OR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.26, 3.01). There was an interaction between MetS and race-ethnicity, such that MetS was associated with lower MMSE score among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics but not non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: MetS was associated with lower cognition in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of the effect of MetS on cognition are warranted, and should account for demographic differences.

AB - Background: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a risk factor for diabetes, stroke, myocardial infarction, and increased mortality, and has been associated with cognition in some populations. We hypothesized that MetS would be associated with lower Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores in a multi-ethnic population, and that MetS is a better predictor of cognition than its individual components or diabetes. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among 3,150 stroke-free participants. MetS was defined by the modified National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Linear regression and polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between MMSE score and MetS, its individual components, diabetes, and inflammatory biomarkers. Results: MetS was inversely associated with MMSE score (unadjusted β = -0.67; 95% CI -0.92, -0.41). Adjusting for potential confounders, MetS was associated with lower MMSE score (adjusted β = -0.24; 95% CI -0.47, -0.01), but its individual components and diabetes were not. Those with MetS were more likely to have an MMSE score of <18 than a score of ≥24 (adjusted OR = 1.94; 95% CI 1.26, 3.01). There was an interaction between MetS and race-ethnicity, such that MetS was associated with lower MMSE score among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics but not non-Hispanic blacks. Conclusions: MetS was associated with lower cognition in a multi-ethnic population. Further studies of the effect of MetS on cognition are warranted, and should account for demographic differences.

KW - Cerebrovascular disorders

KW - Cognitive impairment

KW - Cognitive performance

KW - Metabolic syndrome

KW - Vascular cognitive impairment

KW - Vascular dementia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054063223&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054063223&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000332208

DO - 10.1159/000332208

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 153

EP - 159

JO - Neuroepidemiology

JF - Neuroepidemiology

SN - 0251-5350

IS - 3-4

ER -