The message is in the metaphor

Assessing the comprehension of metaphors in advertisements

Susan Morgan, Tom Reichert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although metaphors are used by advertising creators to convey brand meaning and enhance brand information proc essing, little is understood with regard to consumers' comprehension of intended meaning. This research contributes to this body of knowledge by examining the effect of metaphor type (abstract/concrete) and hemispheric processing on respondents' comprehension of metaphors in ads. Overall, the findings suggest that concrete metaphors are more easily understood than abstract metaphors. This effect is moderated by hemispheric processing such that individuals high in right or integrative processing are more likely to provide valid interpretations of both types of metaphors. These findings are discussed and implications for advertising practitioners are offered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Advertising
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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metaphor
comprehension
Marketing
Processing
Concretes
interpretation
knowledge

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Communication
  • Marketing

Cite this

The message is in the metaphor : Assessing the comprehension of metaphors in advertisements. / Morgan, Susan; Reichert, Tom.

In: Journal of Advertising, Vol. 28, No. 4, 1999, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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