The mediating role of monitoring in the association of religion with self-control

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Religiosity is related to a variety of positive outcomes and the nature of this relationship has long been a topic of inquiry. Recently, it was proposed that an important piece of this puzzle may be the propensity for religious beliefs to promote self-control, a trait that is linked to a range of benefits. How religion translates into self-control, however, remains unclear. We examined the extent to which religiosity's relationship with self-control is mediated by self-monitoring, perceived monitoring by God, and perceived monitoring by other people. Results revealed that more religious people tended to monitor their standing regarding their goals (self-monitoring) to a greater degree, which in turn related to more self-control. Also, religious people tended to believe that a higher power was watching them, which related to greater self-monitoring, which in turn was related to more self-control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-697
Number of pages7
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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Religion

Keywords

  • religion
  • self-control
  • self-focus
  • self-monitoring
  • self-regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The mediating role of monitoring in the association of religion with self-control. / Carter, Evan C.; McCullough, Michael; Carver, Charles S.

In: Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol. 3, No. 6, 01.11.2012, p. 691-697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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