The long-lasting neurobiological scars of early-life stress: Implications for the neurobiology of depression

Mousa Botros, Gabrielle Hodgins, Charles B. Nemeroff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Decades of research have led to the inexorable conclusion that early life stress (ELS) in a variety of forms plays an undeniable role in the vulnerability, development, course, and treatment outcome of depression. Our understanding of how ELS impacts its victims across the domains of the endocrine system, epigenetics, inflammation, gene-environment interactions, neuroanatomy, and neurotransmitter systems has been quite remarkable. This is a review of the epidemiology of ELS and its significant impact on the global population. Recent imaging studies suggest unique neuroanatomical and neurophysiological consequences in the pathology of different forms of ELS. EEG findings have showed significant associations between ELS and certain changes in brain regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeurobiology of Depression
Subtitle of host publicationRoad to Novel Therapeutics
PublisherElsevier
Pages111-121
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780128133330
ISBN (Print)9780128133347
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Brain-derived neurotropic factor
  • Bullying
  • Childhood trauma
  • Corticotropin-releasing hormone
  • Depression
  • Early life stress (ELS)
  • Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis
  • Inflammation
  • Neglect
  • Psychological trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

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