The jellyfish joyride: causes, consequences and management responses to a more gelatinous future

Anthony J. Richardson, Andrew Bakun, Graeme C. Hays, Mark J. Gibbons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

431 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human-induced stresses of overfishing, eutrophication, climate change, translocation and habitat modification appear to be promoting jellyfish (pelagic cnidarian and ctenophore) blooms to the detriment of other marine organisms. Mounting evidence suggests that the structure of pelagic ecosystems can change rapidly from one that is dominated by fish (that keep jellyfish in check through competition or predation) to a less desirable gelatinous state, with lasting ecological, economic and social consequences. Management actions needed to stop such changes require tactical coping strategies and longer-term preventative responses based on fundamental and targeted research on this understudied group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-322
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

jellyfish
Scyphozoa
pelagic ecosystem
coping strategies
coping strategy
Ctenophora
ecological economics
overfishing
Cnidaria
translocation
eutrophication
algal bloom
predation
climate change
ecosystems
organisms
habitat
fish
habitats
marine organism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

The jellyfish joyride : causes, consequences and management responses to a more gelatinous future. / Richardson, Anthony J.; Bakun, Andrew; Hays, Graeme C.; Gibbons, Mark J.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.06.2009, p. 312-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Richardson, Anthony J. ; Bakun, Andrew ; Hays, Graeme C. ; Gibbons, Mark J. / The jellyfish joyride : causes, consequences and management responses to a more gelatinous future. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2009 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 312-322.
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