The Integration of Personal Identity, Religious Identity, and Moral Identity in Emerging Adulthood

Sam A. Hardy, Amber R.C. Nadal, Seth J. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated the relative roles of identity structure (i.e., personal identity) and identity contents (i.e., religious identity and moral identity) in predicting emerging adults’ prosocial and antisocial behaviors. The sample included 9,495 college students. A variable-centered analysis (path analysis) used personal identity, religious identity, and moral identity as predictors of prosocial and antisocial behavior and tested interactions of personal identity with religious identity and moral identity. Moral identity was the strongest predictor of both behaviors, and religious identity and moral identity both interacted with personal identity in predicting antisocial behavior. A person-centered analysis (latent profile analysis) found three classes: integrated, moral identity–focused, and religious identity–focused, with integrated being most adaptive on both outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-107
Number of pages12
JournalIdentity
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Keywords

  • Emerging adulthood
  • identity
  • morality
  • person-centered
  • religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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