The innate immune system and inflammatory bowel disease

Julie M. Davies, Maria T Abreu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The innate immune system is a key factor in understanding the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and in the hopes of improving its treatment. NOD2, a pattern recognition receptor, was one of the first major susceptibility genes identified in Crohn's disease (CD). This discovery has been followed by genome-wide association studies that have identified other genes involved in innate immune responses. Most notably, polymorphisms in the interleukin (IL)-23 receptor have also been linked to IBD-both CD and ulcerative colitis. At the core of the innate immune defects associated with IBD is a lack of generating a robust response to control invasive commensal or pathogenic bacteria. The defect sometimes lies in a failure of the epithelium to express antimicrobial peptides or in defective control of intracellular bacteria by phagocytic cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. The recent identification of innate lymphoid cells that express the IL-23 receptor and generate both proinflammatory and protective or regulatory responses to commensal or pathogenic bacteria provides another layer of complexity to the interplay of host protection and dysregulated inflammation. Although inhibition of tumor necrosis factor has been highly successful as a strategy in treating IBD, we must better understand the nuanced role of other innate cytokines before we may incorporate these in the treatment of IBD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-33
Number of pages10
JournalScandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Immune System
Interleukin Receptors
Interleukin-23
Bacteria
Crohn Disease
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Genome-Wide Association Study
Phagocytes
Ulcerative Colitis
Innate Immunity
Dendritic Cells
Genes
Neutrophils
Epithelium
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Macrophages
Lymphocytes
Cytokines
Inflammation

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • Dendritic cells
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Innate lymphoid cells
  • Interleukin-17
  • Interleukin-23
  • NOD-like receptors
  • Pattern recognition receptors
  • Toll-like receptors
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

The innate immune system and inflammatory bowel disease. / Davies, Julie M.; Abreu, Maria T.

In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 24-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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