The Influence of Relationship Power and Partner Communication on the Syndemic Factor among Hispanic Women

Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda, Brian McCabe, Esther Mathurin, Summer DeBastiani, Nilda Peragallo Montano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study expands research on the substance abuse, intimate partner violence, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and depression syndemic theory for Hispanic women. We hypothesized relationship power and partner communication would be related to the syndemic. Methods: Data were used from the baseline assessment of an effectiveness trial of SEPA (Salud/Health, Educación/Education, Prevención/Prevention, and Autocuidado/Self-care), an HIV/sexually transmitted infection risk reduction program for Hispanic women. Hispanic adult women (n = 320) completed measures (in Spanish or English) of relationship power, partner communication about HIV, and acculturation. The syndemic was defined with a factor model of substance abuse, intimate partner violence, risk for HIV/sexually transmitted infection, and depression using structural equation modeling. Results: Controlling for acculturation and education, relationship power was inversely related to the syndemic factor (β = -0.49, p < .001), but partner communication was not (β = 0.14, p = .054). Acculturation and education were also related to the syndemic factor. These variables combined accounted for more than one-half (53%) of the variance in the syndemic factor. Conclusions: Findings suggest the need to develop and test interventions that address the power dynamics of intimate relationships as a means of reducing health disparities among Hispanic women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWomen's Health Issues
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 17 2016

Fingerprint

Interpersonal Relations
Hispanic Americans
Acculturation
acculturation
HIV
communication
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Depression
violence
Education
education
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Care
health
Health Education
Power (Psychology)
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

The Influence of Relationship Power and Partner Communication on the Syndemic Factor among Hispanic Women. / Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa; McCabe, Brian; Mathurin, Esther; DeBastiani, Summer; Peragallo Montano, Nilda.

In: Women's Health Issues, 17.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa ; McCabe, Brian ; Mathurin, Esther ; DeBastiani, Summer ; Peragallo Montano, Nilda. / The Influence of Relationship Power and Partner Communication on the Syndemic Factor among Hispanic Women. In: Women's Health Issues. 2016.
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