The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance

Betina Yanez, Natalie E. Bustillo, Michael H Antoni, Suzanne C Lechner, Jason Dahn, Bruce Kava, Frank J. Penedo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about whether and how stress management skills may improve adjustment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer who opt for active surveillance. This study examined whether two types of perceived stress management skills, specifically the ability to relax and confidence in coping, moderated the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) concerns and psychological distress. Participants were 71 ethnically diverse men in active surveillance. Coping confidence moderated the relationship between PC concerns and intrusive thoughts (p < .01). At low levels of coping confidence, PC concerns was positively related to intrusive thoughts, β = .95, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, β = .19, p > .05. Coping confidence also moderated the relationship between PC treatment concerns (a subscale of PC concerns) and intrusive thoughts. At low levels of coping confidence, PC treatment concerns was positively associated with intrusive thoughts, β = .73, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, β = .20, p > .05. Findings underscore the importance of interventions aimed at improving coping in men undergoing active surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-223
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Psychology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Active surveillance
  • Distress
  • Oncology
  • Prostate cancer
  • Stress management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance. / Yanez, Betina; Bustillo, Natalie E.; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Dahn, Jason; Kava, Bruce; Penedo, Frank J.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 2, 2015, p. 214-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yanez, Betina ; Bustillo, Natalie E. ; Antoni, Michael H ; Lechner, Suzanne C ; Dahn, Jason ; Kava, Bruce ; Penedo, Frank J. / The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 38, No. 2. pp. 214-223.
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