The impact of improved self-efficacy on HIV viral load and distress in culturally diverse women living with AIDS: The SMART/EST women's project

Gail Ironson, Stephen M Weiss, D. Lydston, M. Ishii, Deborah Jones, D. Asthana, J. Tobin, Suzanne C Lechner, A. Laperriere, Neil Schneiderman, Michael H Antoni

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether changes in self-efficacy over time would be related to changes in disease progression markers (CD4, viral load) in a sample of women with AIDS. A self-efficacy measure was developed and two sub-scales emerged via factor analysis of 391 HIV-positive women: AIDS Self-efficacy and Cognitive Behavioral Skills Self-efficacy. Subsequently, the sub-scales and an additional adherence self-efficacy item were given to 56 HIV-positive women who were measured at two time points three months apart. Half of these women were randomly assigned to a CB intervention and half to a low intensity comparison condition. Increases in AIDS Self-efficacy over the three-month period were significantly related to increases in CD4 and decreases in viral load. Similarly, increases in Cognitive Behavioral Skills Self-efficacy were significantly related to decreases in distress over time. Findings were maintained within the intervention group alone. Interestingly, increases in cognitive behavioral skills self-efficacy and increases in the self-efficacy adherence item were also significantly related to decreases in viral load. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222-236
Number of pages15
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

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Self Efficacy
Viral Load
self-efficacy
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
HIV
Statistical Factor Analysis
Disease Progression
factor analysis
Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of the present study was to determine whether changes in self-efficacy over time would be related to changes in disease progression markers (CD4, viral load) in a sample of women with AIDS. A self-efficacy measure was developed and two sub-scales emerged via factor analysis of 391 HIV-positive women: AIDS Self-efficacy and Cognitive Behavioral Skills Self-efficacy. Subsequently, the sub-scales and an additional adherence self-efficacy item were given to 56 HIV-positive women who were measured at two time points three months apart. Half of these women were randomly assigned to a CB intervention and half to a low intensity comparison condition. Increases in AIDS Self-efficacy over the three-month period were significantly related to increases in CD4 and decreases in viral load. Similarly, increases in Cognitive Behavioral Skills Self-efficacy were significantly related to decreases in distress over time. Findings were maintained within the intervention group alone. Interestingly, increases in cognitive behavioral skills self-efficacy and increases in the self-efficacy adherence item were also significantly related to decreases in viral load. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.",
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