The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients

David Roth, Keith Zucker, Robert Cirocco, Angelo Demattos, George W Burke, Jose Nery, Violet Esquenazi, Sharon Babischkin, Joshua Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

178 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A second generation hepatitis C virus recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) was used to screen stored perioperative serum from 641 renal allograft recipients. One hundred and nine (17%) were anti-HCV positive at the time of transplant. RIBA positivity was found to be an independent predictor of post- transplant liver disease in a logistic regression model (P < 0.05). Moreover, RIBA positive patients were at greater risk for infectious events (P = 0.03) and rejection episodes (P = 0.002). The cumulative dose of antilymphoblast globulin administered as induction therapy was an independent predictor of post-transplant liver disease in a dose response relationship. Qualitative PCR showed that 74% of the perioperative RIBA positive patients had detectable HCV RNA in a current serum sample. Further, quantitative HCV RNA analysis with a competitive template PCR and HCV strain identification by restriction fragment length polymorphism demonstrated a large range of HCV RNA copies/ml of serum and three different HCV strains (BK, Hutch and HCV- I). Neither quantity of HCV RNA nor strain type correlated with abnormal transaminases post-transplant. As yet, there has not been an effect of anti- HCV status on actuarial patient and graft survival. This study suggests that anti-HCV is not a contraindication to renal transplantation; however, we would recommend that the pretransplant evaluation of the anti-HCV positive patient include a liver biopsy to properly stage the disease. Close post- transplant follow-up is required in view of the increased risk for infection and rejection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalKidney International
Volume45
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Allografts
Transplants
Kidney
RNA
Liver Diseases
Logistic Models
Serum
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Antilymphocyte Serum
Graft Survival
Transaminases
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Kidney Transplantation
Biopsy
Liver
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Roth, D., Zucker, K., Cirocco, R., Demattos, A., Burke, G. W., Nery, J., ... Miller, J. (1994). The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients. Kidney International, 45(1), 238-244.

The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients. / Roth, David; Zucker, Keith; Cirocco, Robert; Demattos, Angelo; Burke, George W; Nery, Jose; Esquenazi, Violet; Babischkin, Sharon; Miller, Joshua.

In: Kidney International, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 238-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, D, Zucker, K, Cirocco, R, Demattos, A, Burke, GW, Nery, J, Esquenazi, V, Babischkin, S & Miller, J 1994, 'The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients', Kidney International, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 238-244.
Roth D, Zucker K, Cirocco R, Demattos A, Burke GW, Nery J et al. The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients. Kidney International. 1994 Jan 1;45(1):238-244.
Roth, David ; Zucker, Keith ; Cirocco, Robert ; Demattos, Angelo ; Burke, George W ; Nery, Jose ; Esquenazi, Violet ; Babischkin, Sharon ; Miller, Joshua. / The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on renal allograft recipients. In: Kidney International. 1994 ; Vol. 45, No. 1. pp. 238-244.
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