The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision

Henry L. Feng, Daniel B. Roth, Howard F. Fine, Jonathan L. Prenner, Kunjal K. Modi, William J Feuer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims. To evaluate the impact of back-illuminated and nonilluminated electronic reading devices on reading speed and comfort in patients with decreased vision. Methods. A prospective study involving a convenience sample of 167 patients at a single retina practice from January 2011 to December 2012. Participants were asked to read five different excerpts on five different media in a randomly assigned order. Media included a printed book at 12-point font (12PF), iPad2 at 12PF, iPad2 at 18-point font (18PF), Kindle2 at 12PF, and Kindle2 at 18PF. Reading speed in words per minute (WPM) and medium preference were recorded and stratified by visual acuity (VA). Results. Mean reading speeds in WPM: iPad2 at 18PF (217.0), iPad2 at 12PF (209.1), Kindle2 at 18PF (183.3), Kindle2 at 12PF (177.7), and printed book at 12PF (176.8). Reading speed was faster on back-illuminated media compared to nonilluminated media. Text magnification minimized losses in reading performance with worsening patient VA. The majority of participants preferred reading on the iPad2 at 18PF. Conclusions. Back-illuminated devices may increase reading speed and comfort relative to nonilluminated devices and printed text, particularly in patients with decreased VA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3584706
JournalJournal of Ophthalmology
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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Reading
Equipment and Supplies
Visual Acuity
Patient Acuity
Patient Comfort
Retina
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Feng, H. L., Roth, D. B., Fine, H. F., Prenner, J. L., Modi, K. K., & Feuer, W. J. (2017). The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision. Journal of Ophthalmology, 2017, [3584706]. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3584706

The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision. / Feng, Henry L.; Roth, Daniel B.; Fine, Howard F.; Prenner, Jonathan L.; Modi, Kunjal K.; Feuer, William J.

In: Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 2017, 3584706, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Henry L. ; Roth, Daniel B. ; Fine, Howard F. ; Prenner, Jonathan L. ; Modi, Kunjal K. ; Feuer, William J. / The Impact of Electronic Reading Devices on Reading Speed and Comfort in Patients with Decreased Vision. In: Journal of Ophthalmology. 2017 ; Vol. 2017.
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