The impact of conjunctivochalasis on dry eye symptoms and signs

Priyanka Chhadva, Abigail Alexander, Allison L. McClellan, Katherine T. McManus, Benjamin Seiden, Anat Galor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of this project was to study the relationship between conjunctivocha-lasis (Cch) and ocular signs and symptoms of dry eye. methods. Ninety-six patients with normal eyelid and corneal anatomy were prospectively recruited from a Veterans Administration hospital over 12 months. Symptoms (via the dry eye questionnaire 5 [DEQ5]) and signs of dry eye were assessed along with quality of life implications. Statistical analyses comparing the above metrics among the three groups included χ<sup>2</sup>, analysis of variance, and linear regression tests. Results. Participants were classified into three groups: nasal conjunctivochalasis (NCch; n = 31); nonnasal conjunctivochalasis (non-NCch; n = 41); and no conjunctivochalasis (no-Cch; n = 24). Patients with NCch had more dry eye symptoms than those with non-NCch (DEQ5: NCch = 13.8 ± 5.0, non-NCch = 10.2 ± 5.0, no-Cch = 11.6 ± 5.8; P = 0.014), and more ocular pain than those with Non-NCch and no-Cch (numerical rating scale [NRS]: NCch = 4.5 ± 3.0, non-NCch = 2.3 ± 2.8, no-Cch = 3.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.008). They also had worse dry eye signs compared to those with no-Cch measured by Schirmer score with anesthesia (NCch = 14.5 6 6.9, non-NCch = 16.8 ± 8.2, no-Cch = 19.9 ± 6.4; P = 0.039); meibomian gland dropout (NCch 1.8 ± 0.9, non-NCch = 1.4 ± 1.0, no-Cch = 1.0 ± 1.0; P = 0.020); and eyelid vascularity (NCch = 0.84 ± 0.8, non-NCch = 0.74 ± 0.7, no-Cch = 0.33 ± 0.6; P = 0.019). Moreover, those with NCch more frequently reported that dry eye symptoms moderately to severely impacted their quality of life (NCch = 87%, non-NCch = 51%, no-Cch 58%; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The presence of NCch associates with dry eye symptoms, abnormal tear parameters, and impacts quality of life compared with non-NCch and no-Cch. Based on these data, it is important for clinicians to look for Cch in patients with symptoms of dry eye.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2867-2871
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Signs and Symptoms
Quality of Life
Eyelids
Eye Pain
Meibomian Glands
Veterans Hospitals
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Tears
Nose
Linear Models
Anatomy
Analysis of Variance
Anesthesia

Keywords

  • Conjunctivochalasis
  • Dry eye signs
  • Dry eye symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

The impact of conjunctivochalasis on dry eye symptoms and signs. / Chhadva, Priyanka; Alexander, Abigail; McClellan, Allison L.; McManus, Katherine T.; Seiden, Benjamin; Galor, Anat.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 56, No. 5, 2015, p. 2867-2871.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chhadva, P, Alexander, A, McClellan, AL, McManus, KT, Seiden, B & Galor, A 2015, 'The impact of conjunctivochalasis on dry eye symptoms and signs', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 56, no. 5, pp. 2867-2871. https://doi.org/10.1167/iovs.14-16337
Chhadva, Priyanka ; Alexander, Abigail ; McClellan, Allison L. ; McManus, Katherine T. ; Seiden, Benjamin ; Galor, Anat. / The impact of conjunctivochalasis on dry eye symptoms and signs. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 5. pp. 2867-2871.
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abstract = "Purpose. The purpose of this project was to study the relationship between conjunctivocha-lasis (Cch) and ocular signs and symptoms of dry eye. methods. Ninety-six patients with normal eyelid and corneal anatomy were prospectively recruited from a Veterans Administration hospital over 12 months. Symptoms (via the dry eye questionnaire 5 [DEQ5]) and signs of dry eye were assessed along with quality of life implications. Statistical analyses comparing the above metrics among the three groups included χ2, analysis of variance, and linear regression tests. Results. Participants were classified into three groups: nasal conjunctivochalasis (NCch; n = 31); nonnasal conjunctivochalasis (non-NCch; n = 41); and no conjunctivochalasis (no-Cch; n = 24). Patients with NCch had more dry eye symptoms than those with non-NCch (DEQ5: NCch = 13.8 ± 5.0, non-NCch = 10.2 ± 5.0, no-Cch = 11.6 ± 5.8; P = 0.014), and more ocular pain than those with Non-NCch and no-Cch (numerical rating scale [NRS]: NCch = 4.5 ± 3.0, non-NCch = 2.3 ± 2.8, no-Cch = 3.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.008). They also had worse dry eye signs compared to those with no-Cch measured by Schirmer score with anesthesia (NCch = 14.5 6 6.9, non-NCch = 16.8 ± 8.2, no-Cch = 19.9 ± 6.4; P = 0.039); meibomian gland dropout (NCch 1.8 ± 0.9, non-NCch = 1.4 ± 1.0, no-Cch = 1.0 ± 1.0; P = 0.020); and eyelid vascularity (NCch = 0.84 ± 0.8, non-NCch = 0.74 ± 0.7, no-Cch = 0.33 ± 0.6; P = 0.019). Moreover, those with NCch more frequently reported that dry eye symptoms moderately to severely impacted their quality of life (NCch = 87{\%}, non-NCch = 51{\%}, no-Cch 58{\%}; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The presence of NCch associates with dry eye symptoms, abnormal tear parameters, and impacts quality of life compared with non-NCch and no-Cch. Based on these data, it is important for clinicians to look for Cch in patients with symptoms of dry eye.",
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AU - Galor, Anat

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N2 - Purpose. The purpose of this project was to study the relationship between conjunctivocha-lasis (Cch) and ocular signs and symptoms of dry eye. methods. Ninety-six patients with normal eyelid and corneal anatomy were prospectively recruited from a Veterans Administration hospital over 12 months. Symptoms (via the dry eye questionnaire 5 [DEQ5]) and signs of dry eye were assessed along with quality of life implications. Statistical analyses comparing the above metrics among the three groups included χ2, analysis of variance, and linear regression tests. Results. Participants were classified into three groups: nasal conjunctivochalasis (NCch; n = 31); nonnasal conjunctivochalasis (non-NCch; n = 41); and no conjunctivochalasis (no-Cch; n = 24). Patients with NCch had more dry eye symptoms than those with non-NCch (DEQ5: NCch = 13.8 ± 5.0, non-NCch = 10.2 ± 5.0, no-Cch = 11.6 ± 5.8; P = 0.014), and more ocular pain than those with Non-NCch and no-Cch (numerical rating scale [NRS]: NCch = 4.5 ± 3.0, non-NCch = 2.3 ± 2.8, no-Cch = 3.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.008). They also had worse dry eye signs compared to those with no-Cch measured by Schirmer score with anesthesia (NCch = 14.5 6 6.9, non-NCch = 16.8 ± 8.2, no-Cch = 19.9 ± 6.4; P = 0.039); meibomian gland dropout (NCch 1.8 ± 0.9, non-NCch = 1.4 ± 1.0, no-Cch = 1.0 ± 1.0; P = 0.020); and eyelid vascularity (NCch = 0.84 ± 0.8, non-NCch = 0.74 ± 0.7, no-Cch = 0.33 ± 0.6; P = 0.019). Moreover, those with NCch more frequently reported that dry eye symptoms moderately to severely impacted their quality of life (NCch = 87%, non-NCch = 51%, no-Cch 58%; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The presence of NCch associates with dry eye symptoms, abnormal tear parameters, and impacts quality of life compared with non-NCch and no-Cch. Based on these data, it is important for clinicians to look for Cch in patients with symptoms of dry eye.

AB - Purpose. The purpose of this project was to study the relationship between conjunctivocha-lasis (Cch) and ocular signs and symptoms of dry eye. methods. Ninety-six patients with normal eyelid and corneal anatomy were prospectively recruited from a Veterans Administration hospital over 12 months. Symptoms (via the dry eye questionnaire 5 [DEQ5]) and signs of dry eye were assessed along with quality of life implications. Statistical analyses comparing the above metrics among the three groups included χ2, analysis of variance, and linear regression tests. Results. Participants were classified into three groups: nasal conjunctivochalasis (NCch; n = 31); nonnasal conjunctivochalasis (non-NCch; n = 41); and no conjunctivochalasis (no-Cch; n = 24). Patients with NCch had more dry eye symptoms than those with non-NCch (DEQ5: NCch = 13.8 ± 5.0, non-NCch = 10.2 ± 5.0, no-Cch = 11.6 ± 5.8; P = 0.014), and more ocular pain than those with Non-NCch and no-Cch (numerical rating scale [NRS]: NCch = 4.5 ± 3.0, non-NCch = 2.3 ± 2.8, no-Cch = 3.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.008). They also had worse dry eye signs compared to those with no-Cch measured by Schirmer score with anesthesia (NCch = 14.5 6 6.9, non-NCch = 16.8 ± 8.2, no-Cch = 19.9 ± 6.4; P = 0.039); meibomian gland dropout (NCch 1.8 ± 0.9, non-NCch = 1.4 ± 1.0, no-Cch = 1.0 ± 1.0; P = 0.020); and eyelid vascularity (NCch = 0.84 ± 0.8, non-NCch = 0.74 ± 0.7, no-Cch = 0.33 ± 0.6; P = 0.019). Moreover, those with NCch more frequently reported that dry eye symptoms moderately to severely impacted their quality of life (NCch = 87%, non-NCch = 51%, no-Cch 58%; P = 0.005). Conclusions. The presence of NCch associates with dry eye symptoms, abnormal tear parameters, and impacts quality of life compared with non-NCch and no-Cch. Based on these data, it is important for clinicians to look for Cch in patients with symptoms of dry eye.

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