The impact of caregiver support on mortality following burn injury in the elderly

Salman K. Alsafran, James S. Davis, Susan Tankel, Robin Varas, Olga Quintana, Ron Manning, Candace Glenn, Louis R. Pizano, Nicholas Namias, Carl I. Schulman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in burn care have decreased mortality in the past 20 years, but affecting elderly mortality rates (>65 years) remain challenging. This study evaluates the impact of home caregiver support on elderly burn patients' mortality. The authors retrospectively reviewed patients aged 65 and older admitted to their burn center from July 1995 to October 2004. Patient demographics, Injury Severity Score, TBSA, and patients' primary caregiver were collected. The outcomes were mortality, disposition, and length of stay and these were evaluated using univariate and subsequently multivariate regression. Significance was calculated at P ≤.05. A total of 112 patients were included in the analysis. The mean age was 76±8. Male patients constituted 47%, whereas 53% were female patients, and mean TBSA was 21±16%. Thirty patients' primary caregiver was a spouse, for 38 it was a child, and 44 had no caregiver. Fifty-eight patients survived (51.7%), and 54 patients died (48.3%). Only 21% of the survivors had a child as their primary caregiver; however, 48% of the nonsurvivors had a child as the primary caregiver (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, age, TBSA, and child as primary caregiver were all independent predictors of mortality. Having a child as a caregiver provided the largest impact, with an odds ratio of 4.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-15.62; P =.02).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-310
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of caregiver support on mortality following burn injury in the elderly'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this