The impact of a standardized disease management program on race/ethnicity and gender disparities in care and mortality

Kathy Hebert, Barbara Lopez, Ron Horswell, Leonardo Tamariz, Ana M Palacio, Hua Li, Lee M. Arcement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Data on racial and gender differences in mortality in patients followed in a standardized heart failure disease management program (HFDMP) are scarce. Methods. Survival was calculated by race/ethnicity and gender for 837 patients enrolled in a HFDMP. (The patients studied were indigent African American and White outpatients [39% African American, 36% female] enrolled into at Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center in Houma, Louisiana.) The hazard ratio associated with demographic and clinical characteristic individually and as a whole, was estimated for the four groups. Results. White males had the highest mortality (African American female: HR=0.64, African American male: HR=0.65, White female: HR=0.67, p<.05). Age (HR=1.04, p<.001), ejection fraction (HR=0.97, p<.001), New York Heart Association (NYHA) (HR=1.57, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (HR=0.99, p<05), hematocrit (HR=0.96, p<01), diabetes (HR=0.98, p<05), and body mass index (HR=0.98, p<05) were significant predictors of mortality in the univariate model. Age (HR=1.04, p<001), NYHA (HR=1.40, p<001), diabetes (HR=2.52, p<001), and White female (HR=.44, p<01) were significant predictors of mortality in the multivariate model. Conclusion. With the exception of White females, who demonstrated lower mortality, amongst African American males and females and White males who participated in a HFDMP no difference in survival was observed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)264-276
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

Fingerprint

Disease Management
African Americans
Mortality
Heart Diseases
Heart Failure
Blood Pressure
Survival
Poverty
Hematocrit
Body Mass Index
Outpatients
Demography

Keywords

  • African American
  • Disease management
  • Heart failure
  • Indigent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The impact of a standardized disease management program on race/ethnicity and gender disparities in care and mortality. / Hebert, Kathy; Lopez, Barbara; Horswell, Ron; Tamariz, Leonardo; Palacio, Ana M; Li, Hua; Arcement, Lee M.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.02.2010, p. 264-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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