The Health Consequences of Adverse Labor Market Events: Evidence from Panel Data

Johanna Catherine Maclean, Douglas A. Webber, Michael T. French, Susan L. Ettner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigates the associations between self-assessed adverse labor market events (experiencing problems with coworkers, employment changes, financial strain) and health. Longitudinal data are obtained from the National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Our findings suggest problems with coworkers, employment changes, and financial strain are associated, respectively, with a 3.1 percent (3.3 percent), 0.9 percent (0.2 percent), and 4.5 percent (5.1 percent) reduction in mental health among men (women). Associations are smaller in magnitude and less significant for physical health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)478-498
Number of pages21
JournalIndustrial Relations
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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