The health care reform in Mexico

Before and after the 1985 earthquakes

G. Soberon, Julio Frenk, J. Sepulveda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination whithin the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lession to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-680
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume76
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Earthquakes
Health Care Reform
Mexico
Health
Delivery of Health Care
Population
Disasters
Primary Health Care
Decision Making
Economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The health care reform in Mexico : Before and after the 1985 earthquakes. / Soberon, G.; Frenk, Julio; Sepulveda, J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 76, No. 6, 1986, p. 673-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{fb22ba6e78574ad9a677c2b59e8d2cde,
title = "The health care reform in Mexico: Before and after the 1985 earthquakes",
abstract = "The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination whithin the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lession to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary.",
author = "G. Soberon and Julio Frenk and J. Sepulveda",
year = "1986",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "673--680",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The health care reform in Mexico

T2 - Before and after the 1985 earthquakes

AU - Soberon, G.

AU - Frenk, Julio

AU - Sepulveda, J.

PY - 1986

Y1 - 1986

N2 - The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination whithin the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lession to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary.

AB - The earthquakes that hit Mexico City in September 1985 caused considerable damage both to the population and to important medical facilities. The disaster took place while the country was undertaking a profound reform of its health care system. This reform had introduced a new principle for allocating and distributing the benefits of health care, namely, the principle of citizenship. Operationally, the reform includes an effort to decentralize the decision-making authority, to modernize the administration, to achieve greater coordination whithin the health sector and among sectors, and to extend coverage to the entire population through an ambitious primary care program. This paper examines the health context in which the reform was taking place when the September earthquakes hit. After presenting the damages caused by the quakes, the paper analyzes the characteristics of the immediate response by the health system. Since many facilities within the system were severely damaged, a series of options for reconstruction are posited. The main lession to be learned from the Mexican case is that cuts in health care programs are not the inevitable response to economic or natural crises. On the contrary, it is precisely when the majority of the population is undergoing difficulties that a universal and equitable health system becomes most necessary.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022519313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022519313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 76

SP - 673

EP - 680

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 6

ER -