The Face of Negative Affect

Trial-by-Trial Corrugator Responses to Negative Pictures Are Positively Associated with Amygdala and Negatively Associated with Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity

Aaron Heller, Regina C. Lapate, Kaitlyn E. Mayer, Richard J. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to simultaneously acquire objective physiological measures of emotion concurrent with fMRI holds the promise to enhance our understanding of the biological bases of affect and thus improve our knowledge of the neural circuitry underlying psychiatric disorders. However, the vast majority of neuroimaging studies to date examining emotion have not anchored the examination of emotion-responding circuitry to objective measures of emotional processing. To that end, we acquired EMG activity of a valence-sensitive facial muscle involved in the frowning response (corrugator muscle) concurrent with fMRI while twenty-six human participants viewed negative and neutral images. Trial-by-trial increases in corrugator EMG activity to negative pictures were associated with greater amygdala activity and a concurrent decrease in ventromedial PFC activity. Thus, this study highlights the reciprocal relation between amygdalar and ventromedial PFC in the encoding of emotional valence as reflected by facial expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2102-2110
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Amygdala
Prefrontal Cortex
Emotions
emotion
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Facial Muscles
Facial Expression
Aptitude
Neuroimaging
facial expression
Psychiatry
Muscles
examination
Emotion
ability
Electromyography
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Valence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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AU - Lapate, Regina C.

AU - Mayer, Kaitlyn E.

AU - Davidson, Richard J.

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