The evolution of vocal learning

Stephen Nowicki, William Searcy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vocal learning, in which animals modify their vocalizations to imitate those of others, has evolved independently in scattered lineages of birds and mammals. Comparative evidence supports two hypotheses for the selective advantages leading to the origin of vocal learning. The sexual selection hypothesis proposes that vocal learning evolves to allow expansion of vocal repertoires in response to mating preferences for more complex vocalizations. The information-sharing hypothesis also proposes that vocal learning evolves to allow expansion of vocal repertoires, but in this case in response to kin selection favoring sharing of information among relatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Learning
Information Dissemination
Birds
Mammals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The evolution of vocal learning. / Nowicki, Stephen; Searcy, William.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 28, 01.01.2014, p. 48-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nowicki, Stephen ; Searcy, William. / The evolution of vocal learning. In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 2014 ; Vol. 28. pp. 48-53.
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