The Effects of Race Differences in Work History, Work Attitudes, Economic Resources, and Health on Women ’ Retirement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of work history, work attitudes, economic resources, and health on the retirement of women, particularly Black women, are poorly understood. This report examines racial differences in these factors and in their effects on the decision to retire, using data gathered from 258 Black and white women aged 62 through 66. Results showed that Black women were considerably more likely than whites to have worked steadily most of their adult lives, although Black and white women expressed quite similar attitudes toward work. Reflecting their work histories, Black women were more likely than whites to be eligible for pensions but were less likely to have retired. In multivariate analysis poor health was a predictor of retirement for both Black and white women, while low average income over the last five years of employment was a predictor only for Blacks. Work history and attitude were unrelated to retirement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-398
Number of pages16
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1988
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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