The effects of long-term non-fatiguing resistance exercise in subjects with post-polio syndrome

M. J. Fillyaw, G. J. Badger, G. D. Goodwin, Walter G Bradley, T. J. Fries, A. Shukla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Measures of torque were used to evaluate changes in muscle strength and endurance in 17 patients with post-polio syndrome who did prescribed resistance exercise for up to 2 years. Exercise compliance averaged 75%, with 16 subjects increasing the weight lifted in training. Maximum torque was significantly increased in the exercised muscle compared to the control muscle; no difference was seen in muscle endurance. Individuals with post-polio syndrome can increase muscle strength by doing non-fatiguing resistance exercise, but they should undergo quantitative testing of muscle strength a minimum of every 3 months to guard against overwork weakness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1256
Number of pages4
JournalOrthopedics
Volume14
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Fillyaw, M. J., Badger, G. J., Goodwin, G. D., Bradley, W. G., Fries, T. J., & Shukla, A. (1991). The effects of long-term non-fatiguing resistance exercise in subjects with post-polio syndrome. Orthopedics, 14(11), 1253-1256.