The effects of information and negative affect on severity of side effects from radiation therapy for prostate cancer

Youngmee Kim, Joseph A. Roscoe, Gary R. Morrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A randomized clinical trial with 152 patients was conducted to examine the effects of an informational intervention on the severity of side effects resulting from radiation therapy for prostate cancer. We also examined negative affect both as a predictor and as an outcome variable. The informational intervention, given to patients at the first and fifth treatments, was based upon self-regulation theory and provided patients with specific, objective information about what to expect during their radiation treatments. Patients in the comparison group received general information at the same point in time. Negative affect was measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) prior to the intervention and at the last treatment. The severity of side effects for each individual was assessed at their last treatment. The results showed that patients in the informational intervention group reported significantly fewer problems with sleep and less fatigue (marginally significant) than those in the comparison group. Negative affect was not influenced by group assignment. Baseline negative affect was not related to symptom development, although the development of side effects was associated with an increase in negative mood. The results suggest that patients could benefit from increased knowledge about what to expect during their radiation treatments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-421
Number of pages6
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Prostatic Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Radiation
Therapeutics
Fatigue
Sleep
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • Informational intervention
  • Negative affect
  • Radiation therapy
  • Side effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

The effects of information and negative affect on severity of side effects from radiation therapy for prostate cancer. / Kim, Youngmee; Roscoe, Joseph A.; Morrow, Gary R.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.12.2002, p. 416-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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