The Effects of Implicit Religious Primes on Dictator Game Allocations: A Preregistered Replication Experiment

Cristina M. Gomes, Michael McCullough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Shariff and Norenzayan (2007) discovered that people allocate more money to anonymous strangers in a dictator game following a scrambled sentence task that involved words with religious meanings. We conducted a direct replication of key elements of Shariff and Norenzayan's (2007) Experiment 2, with some additional changes. Specifically, we (a) collected data from a much larger sample of participants (N = 650); (b) added a second religious priming condition that attempted to prime thoughts of religion less conspicuously;

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 13 2015

Keywords

  • Dictator game
  • Experimental economics
  • Generosity
  • Implicit priming
  • Religious priming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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