The effects of comprehensive school reform models in reading for Urban middle school students with disabilities

Margaret E. Shippen, David E. Houchins, Mary Calhoon, Carolyn F. Furlow, Donya L. Sartor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) has mandated sweeping accountability in public education. Low-performing urban schools find themselves in the crossfire of political and educational divergence. Comprehensive school reform (CSR) models predate NCLB, but the impact of their implementation has been even more pronounced since the passage of NCLB. With adequate yearly progress as the national measure of school achievement, the lowest performing students in the lowest performing schools have turned out to be the most critical group to support. We compared the effects of two CSR models (Success for All and Direct Instruction) in reading for urban middle school students with disabilities who were performing 2 or more years below grade level in reading. The results indicated that students with disabilities showed little or no reading skill gain from either comprehensive school reform model and remained markedly behind. Improving the skills of the lowest performing students in a timely manner appears to continue to be education's greatest challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-328
Number of pages7
JournalRemedial and Special Education
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

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reform model
school model
comprehensive school
school reform
Reading
disability
Students
act
student
school
public education
divergence
school grade
Education
instruction
Social Responsibility
responsibility
Prednisolone
education
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

The effects of comprehensive school reform models in reading for Urban middle school students with disabilities. / Shippen, Margaret E.; Houchins, David E.; Calhoon, Mary; Furlow, Carolyn F.; Sartor, Donya L.

In: Remedial and Special Education, Vol. 27, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 322-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shippen, Margaret E. ; Houchins, David E. ; Calhoon, Mary ; Furlow, Carolyn F. ; Sartor, Donya L. / The effects of comprehensive school reform models in reading for Urban middle school students with disabilities. In: Remedial and Special Education. 2006 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 322-328.
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