The effects of active and passive recovery on short-term, high intensity power output.

Joseph Signorile, C. Ingalls, L. M. Tremblay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The advantage of active over passive recovery from long and intermediate duration exercise is well documented. Success has been attributed to metabolite washout and/or lactate (La) utilization by the active musculature. This study was designed to determine whether active recovery was superior to passive rest during short duration, high intensity performance. On 4 separate days, six athletes performed a set of eight 6-s power tests separated by 30-s recovery intervals under two recovery conditions. Recovery conditions involved either sitting passively on the bike (P) or actively pedaling (A) at 60 rpm using 1 kg resistance. A MANOVA on peak power (PP), fatigue rate (F), and total work (TW) showed a significant difference due to recovery condition, F(3, 169); p < .0001. Separate ANOVAs revealed that PP (A = 1192.85 watts, P = 1134.57 watts; p < .0001) and TW (A = 6.59 kJ, P = 6.23 kJ; p < .0001) differed significantly between conditions. No difference was found for F (A = 80.12 watts.sec-1, P = 79.80 watts.sec-1). Results indicate that active recovery provides superior performance to passive rest in repeated short-term, high intensity power activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-42
Number of pages12
JournalCanadian journal of applied physiology = Revue canadienne de physiologie appliquee
Volume18
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 1993

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Athletes
Fatigue
Foot
Lactic Acid
Analysis of Variance
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The effects of active and passive recovery on short-term, high intensity power output. / Signorile, Joseph; Ingalls, C.; Tremblay, L. M.

In: Canadian journal of applied physiology = Revue canadienne de physiologie appliquee, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.03.1993, p. 31-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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