The Effect of Longer-Acting vs Shorter-Acting Testosterone Therapy on Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone

Thomas A. Masterson, Darren Turner, Duyen Vo, Ruben Blachman-Braun, Jordan C. Best, Gerwin Westfield, Nathan Bryson, Ranjith Ramasamy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Abstract Introduction: Testosterone (T) replacement therapy causes suppression of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) that can lead to decrease in semen parameters and possible infertility. Different T formulations may have varying suppression on FSH and LH. Objective: To study whether shorter-acting T (multiple daily dosing) has less suppression on FSH and LH serum levels compared with longer-acting T (transdermal gel, injectable). Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted by following the protocol based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis protocols. We comprehensively reviewed the literature by systematically searching manuscripts indexed in PubMed from 1995 to March 13, 2019 to identify studies reporting changes in FSH and LH in hypogonadal men treated with exogenous T which evaluated the effect of exogenous T on FSH and LH. Results: A total of 8 studies reported the effect of T on FSH and LH in 793 hypogonadal men: 2 used long-acting injectables (enanthate or undecanoate) in a total of 16 men, 5 used intermediate-acting daily topical gels or patches in a total of 471 men, and 1 used short-acting intranasal T (125 μL/nostril, twice a day or three times a day) in 306 men. Long-acting injectables decreased FSH by 86.3%, intermediate-acting daily gels/patches decreased FSH by 60.2%, and short-acting intranasal gel decreased FSH by 37.8%. Long-acting injectables decreased LH by 71.8%, intermediate-acting daily gels/patches decreased LH by 59.2%, and short-acting intranasal gel decreased LH by 47.3%. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that short-acting T preparations do not decrease serum FSH or LH to the same extent as longer-acting transdermal gels and injectables. However, further clinical trial data are necessary to determine whether the effect of short-acting TRT on gonadotropins translates into similar changes in semen parameters and fertility. Masterson TA, Turner D, Vo D, et al. The Effect of Longer-Acting vs Shorter-Acting Testosterone Therapy on Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone. Sex Med Rev 2020;XX:XXX–XXX.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSexual Medicine Reviews
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Follicle-Stimulating Hormone
  • Gonadotropins
  • Luteinizing Hormone
  • Testosterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

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