The Drift Diffusion Model can account for the accuracy and reaction time of value-based choices under high and low time pressure

Milica Mormann, Jonathan Malmaud, Alexander Huth, Christof Koch, Antonio Rangel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An important open problem is how values are compared to make simple choices. A natural hypothesis is that the brain carries out the computations associated with the value comparisons in a manner consistent with the Drift Diffusion Model (DDM), since this model has been able to account for a large amount of data in other domains. We investigated the ability of four different versions of the DDM to explain the data in a real binary food choice task under conditions of high and low time pressure. We found that a seven-parameter version of the DDM can account for the choice and reaction time data with high-accuracy, in both the high and low time pressure conditions. The changes associated with the introduction of time pressure could be traced to changes in two key model parameters: the barrier height and the noise in the slope of the drift process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-449
Number of pages13
JournalJudgment and Decision Making
Volume5
Issue number6
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Statistical Models
Noise
Food
Brain
Value of time
Time pressure
Diffusion model
Food choice

Keywords

  • Drift-diffusion model
  • Response time
  • Value-based choice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Decision Sciences(all)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

The Drift Diffusion Model can account for the accuracy and reaction time of value-based choices under high and low time pressure. / Mormann, Milica; Malmaud, Jonathan; Huth, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Rangel, Antonio.

In: Judgment and Decision Making, Vol. 5, No. 6, 10.2010, p. 437-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mormann, Milica ; Malmaud, Jonathan ; Huth, Alexander ; Koch, Christof ; Rangel, Antonio. / The Drift Diffusion Model can account for the accuracy and reaction time of value-based choices under high and low time pressure. In: Judgment and Decision Making. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 437-449.
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