The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States

Kriya Gishen, Steven Ovadia, Samantha Arzillo, Yash Avashia, Seth Thaller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-38
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Craniofacial Surgery
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Medical Education
Accreditation
Internship and Residency
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Premedical Education
Physicians
Graduate Medical Education
Organized Financing
American Medical Association
Plastic Surgery
Medical Schools
Curriculum
Publications

Keywords

  • Advances in education
  • educational reform
  • medical education
  • medical school
  • plastic surgery
  • residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States. / Gishen, Kriya; Ovadia, Steven; Arzillo, Samantha; Avashia, Yash; Thaller, Seth.

In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 35-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gishen, Kriya ; Ovadia, Steven ; Arzillo, Samantha ; Avashia, Yash ; Thaller, Seth. / The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States. In: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 35-38.
@article{9e6299a944434319baa66ad8c9115fdf,
title = "The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States",
abstract = "The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.",
keywords = "Advances in education, educational reform, medical education, medical school, plastic surgery, residency training",
author = "Kriya Gishen and Steven Ovadia and Samantha Arzillo and Yash Avashia and Seth Thaller",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.scs.0000436737.67665.ab",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "35--38",
journal = "Journal of Craniofacial Surgery",
issn = "1049-2275",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The current format and ongoing advances of medical education in the United States

AU - Gishen, Kriya

AU - Ovadia, Steven

AU - Arzillo, Samantha

AU - Avashia, Yash

AU - Thaller, Seth

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

AB - The objective of this study was to examine the current system of medical education along with the advances that are being made to support the demands of a changing health care system. American medical education must reform to anticipate the future needs of a changing health care system. Since the dramatic transformations to medical education that followed the publication of the Flexner report in 1910, medical education in the United States has largely remained unaltered. Today, the education of future physicians is undergoing modifications at all levels: premedical education, medical school, and residency training. Advances are being made with respect to curriculum design and content, standardized testing, and accreditation milestones. Fields such as plastic surgery are taking strides toward improving resident training as the next accreditation system is established. To promote more efficacious medical education, the American Medical Association has provided grants for innovations in education. Likewise, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlined 6 core competencies to standardize the educational goals of residency training. Such efforts are likely to improve the education of future physicians so that they are able to meet the future needs of American health care.

KW - Advances in education

KW - educational reform

KW - medical education

KW - medical school

KW - plastic surgery

KW - residency training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84893370222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84893370222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.scs.0000436737.67665.ab

DO - 10.1097/01.scs.0000436737.67665.ab

M3 - Article

C2 - 24406555

AN - SCOPUS:84893370222

VL - 25

SP - 35

EP - 38

JO - Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

JF - Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

SN - 1049-2275

IS - 1

ER -