The current economic burden of cirrhosis

Guy W. Neff, Christopher W. Duncan, Eugene R Schiff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cirrhosis is a worldwide problem that is associated with a substantial economic burden. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and alcoholic liver disease are the main causes of cirrhosis, but cost-effective preventive strategies are only available for HBV infection. Treatment algorithms for HBV infection and HCV infection are numerous and may be economically advantageous, depending on the regimen utilized; however, effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease is lacking, with abstinence from alcohol consumption continuing to be the main treatment strategy. In addition, liver transplantation (the only cure for cirrhosis) continues to consume substantial economic resources despite a recent reduction in overall cost. More sensitive predictors of post-liver transplantation disability could reduce this cost by allowing interventions that would promote productivity and increase health-related quality of life after liver transplantation. This paper highlights recent publications that evaluate the cost-effectiveness of strategies that prevent or treat the main causes of cirrhosis as well as publications that assess the impact of quality of life on the overall cost burden of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)661-671
Number of pages11
JournalGastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume7
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

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Virus Diseases
Fibrosis
Economics
Hepatitis B virus
Liver Transplantation
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hepacivirus
Quality of Life
Cost of Illness
Alcohol Drinking
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Publications
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cirrhosis
  • Cost
  • Economic burden
  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Quality-adjusted life years

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

The current economic burden of cirrhosis. / Neff, Guy W.; Duncan, Christopher W.; Schiff, Eugene R.

In: Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 7, No. 10, 01.10.2011, p. 661-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neff, GW, Duncan, CW & Schiff, ER 2011, 'The current economic burden of cirrhosis', Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 7, no. 10, pp. 661-671.
Neff, Guy W. ; Duncan, Christopher W. ; Schiff, Eugene R. / The current economic burden of cirrhosis. In: Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2011 ; Vol. 7, No. 10. pp. 661-671.
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