The Cost and Intensity of Behavioral Interventions to Promote HIV Treatment for Prevention Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

Steven Safren, Nicholas S. Perry, Aaron J. Blashill, Conall O’Cleirigh, Kenneth H. Mayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recently, behavioral prevention interventions for HIV have been criticized as being ineffective, costly, or inefficient. In this commentary, using HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) as an illustrative high-risk population, we argue that the opposite is true—that behavioral interventions for HIV prevention, if implemented with the populations who need them, are affordable and critical for future prevention efforts. We base this argument on recent evidence showing that (1) adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for prevention purposes is necessary to suppress HIV replication and reduce transmissibility, (2) individuals living with HIV have multiple psychosocial concerns that impact self-care and moderate the potential effectiveness of health behavior interventions, and (3) intensive interventions targeting both concerns together (psychosocial and HIV care) can show clinically significant improvement. We follow by comparing the cost of these types of interventions to the cost of standard clinical treatment for HIV with ART and demonstrate a cost-savings of potential intensive behavioral interventions for, in this case, HIV-positive MSM who have uncontrolled virus. Keeping this evidence in mind, we conclude that individual intervention must remain a mainstay of HIV prevention for certain critical populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1833-1841
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 7 2015

Fingerprint

HIV
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Population
Costs
AIDS/HIV
Cost Savings
Health Behavior
Self Care
Viruses

Keywords

  • Cost
  • HIV
  • Intervention
  • Prevention
  • Sexual orientation
  • Syndemic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

The Cost and Intensity of Behavioral Interventions to Promote HIV Treatment for Prevention Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men. / Safren, Steven; Perry, Nicholas S.; Blashill, Aaron J.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H.

In: Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 44, No. 7, 07.10.2015, p. 1833-1841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Safren, Steven ; Perry, Nicholas S. ; Blashill, Aaron J. ; O’Cleirigh, Conall ; Mayer, Kenneth H. / The Cost and Intensity of Behavioral Interventions to Promote HIV Treatment for Prevention Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men. In: Archives of Sexual Behavior. 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 7. pp. 1833-1841.
@article{45a64196e8f44b34923ad5f8cb859837,
title = "The Cost and Intensity of Behavioral Interventions to Promote HIV Treatment for Prevention Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men",
abstract = "Recently, behavioral prevention interventions for HIV have been criticized as being ineffective, costly, or inefficient. In this commentary, using HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) as an illustrative high-risk population, we argue that the opposite is true—that behavioral interventions for HIV prevention, if implemented with the populations who need them, are affordable and critical for future prevention efforts. We base this argument on recent evidence showing that (1) adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for prevention purposes is necessary to suppress HIV replication and reduce transmissibility, (2) individuals living with HIV have multiple psychosocial concerns that impact self-care and moderate the potential effectiveness of health behavior interventions, and (3) intensive interventions targeting both concerns together (psychosocial and HIV care) can show clinically significant improvement. We follow by comparing the cost of these types of interventions to the cost of standard clinical treatment for HIV with ART and demonstrate a cost-savings of potential intensive behavioral interventions for, in this case, HIV-positive MSM who have uncontrolled virus. Keeping this evidence in mind, we conclude that individual intervention must remain a mainstay of HIV prevention for certain critical populations.",
keywords = "Cost, HIV, Intervention, Prevention, Sexual orientation, Syndemic",
author = "Steven Safren and Perry, {Nicholas S.} and Blashill, {Aaron J.} and Conall O’Cleirigh and Mayer, {Kenneth H.}",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1007/s10508-014-0455-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "1833--1841",
journal = "Archives of Sexual Behavior",
issn = "0004-0002",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Cost and Intensity of Behavioral Interventions to Promote HIV Treatment for Prevention Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men

AU - Safren, Steven

AU - Perry, Nicholas S.

AU - Blashill, Aaron J.

AU - O’Cleirigh, Conall

AU - Mayer, Kenneth H.

PY - 2015/10/7

Y1 - 2015/10/7

N2 - Recently, behavioral prevention interventions for HIV have been criticized as being ineffective, costly, or inefficient. In this commentary, using HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) as an illustrative high-risk population, we argue that the opposite is true—that behavioral interventions for HIV prevention, if implemented with the populations who need them, are affordable and critical for future prevention efforts. We base this argument on recent evidence showing that (1) adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for prevention purposes is necessary to suppress HIV replication and reduce transmissibility, (2) individuals living with HIV have multiple psychosocial concerns that impact self-care and moderate the potential effectiveness of health behavior interventions, and (3) intensive interventions targeting both concerns together (psychosocial and HIV care) can show clinically significant improvement. We follow by comparing the cost of these types of interventions to the cost of standard clinical treatment for HIV with ART and demonstrate a cost-savings of potential intensive behavioral interventions for, in this case, HIV-positive MSM who have uncontrolled virus. Keeping this evidence in mind, we conclude that individual intervention must remain a mainstay of HIV prevention for certain critical populations.

AB - Recently, behavioral prevention interventions for HIV have been criticized as being ineffective, costly, or inefficient. In this commentary, using HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) as an illustrative high-risk population, we argue that the opposite is true—that behavioral interventions for HIV prevention, if implemented with the populations who need them, are affordable and critical for future prevention efforts. We base this argument on recent evidence showing that (1) adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) for prevention purposes is necessary to suppress HIV replication and reduce transmissibility, (2) individuals living with HIV have multiple psychosocial concerns that impact self-care and moderate the potential effectiveness of health behavior interventions, and (3) intensive interventions targeting both concerns together (psychosocial and HIV care) can show clinically significant improvement. We follow by comparing the cost of these types of interventions to the cost of standard clinical treatment for HIV with ART and demonstrate a cost-savings of potential intensive behavioral interventions for, in this case, HIV-positive MSM who have uncontrolled virus. Keeping this evidence in mind, we conclude that individual intervention must remain a mainstay of HIV prevention for certain critical populations.

KW - Cost

KW - HIV

KW - Intervention

KW - Prevention

KW - Sexual orientation

KW - Syndemic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940963579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940963579&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10508-014-0455-3

DO - 10.1007/s10508-014-0455-3

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 1833

EP - 1841

JO - Archives of Sexual Behavior

JF - Archives of Sexual Behavior

SN - 0004-0002

IS - 7

ER -