The butyrylcholinesterase gene is neither independently nor synergistically associated with late-onset AD in clinic- and community-based populations

F. Crawford, D. Fallin, Z. Suo, L. Abdullah, M. Gold, A. Gauntlett, R. Duara, M. Mullan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

The K variant of the butyrylcholinesterase gene (BChE) was recently found to occur at an increased frequency in a late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) population, specifically in individuals carrying the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. This suggested synergy between these two genes resulting in an increased risk of late-onset AD. We have genotyped 62 community-based and 329 clinic-based AD cases, and 201 community-based controls at BChE and APOE and find no independent association between BChE and AD nor interaction with APOE in risk for AD in either our clinic or community-based samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-118
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume249
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 1998

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Apolipoprotein E
  • Butyrylcholinesterase
  • Genetic association
  • K variant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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