The bee fauna (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) of Everglades National Park, Florida and adjacent areas: Distribution, phenology, and biogeography

John B. Pascarella, Keith D. Waddington, Paul R. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

We conducted an intensive survey of the bee fauna of Everglades National Park (ENP), Florida. We identified bees (Apoidea) from our field collections (1995-1997) and reviewed published records and collections in regional museums. Sixty-six species of bees occurred in ENP. Thirty-eight additional species were recorded from outside of ENP in Dade and Monroe Counties (total of 104 sp.). The most diverse site in ENP was the Long Pine Key region. Peak diversity was observed from March-April. The numbers of species per family in ENP were: Megachilidae (30), Apidae (17), Halictidae (13), and Colletidae (6). The most diverse genus was Megachile (Megachilidae), with 17 sp. in ENP. Three endemic, two introduced, and twelve parasitic species occurred in ENP. The most diverse parasitic group was Coelioxys (Megachilidae), with 7 sp. present in ENP. The bee fauna is distinct from adjacent tropical areas of the Bahamas, Cuba, and the Yucatan, sharing only a few species with them. Most species in ENP and the region are Nearctic. Compared to northern Florida, the fauna lacks numerous genera and species in the Andrenidae and Apidae. Local and regional differences in bee species composition may reflect lack of suitable ground nesting habitat in ENP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-45
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Volume72
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

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