The awakening of faith in anarchism: A forgotten chapter in the Chinese Buddhist encounter with modernity

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines a hitherto lost and forgotten essay by Taixu (1890–1947), a central figure in the creation of Buddhist modernism in China. The essay, ‘The Three Great Evils of the World’, was written during his period of involvement with radicalism in the years surrounding the 1911 revolution. The article shows that this involvement was both longer lasting and more significant than has been previously recognized. ‘The Three Great Evils of the World’ represents the culmination of this period in Taixu’s intellectual development. In it, we find a convergence of two narratives of liberation – one anarchist and one Buddhist – that extends Chinese Buddhist thought beyond what has been termed the ‘threshold of modernity’ and reveals surprising resonances between the two traditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-243
Number of pages20
JournalPolitics, Religion and Ideology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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China
Buddhist
Faith
Anarchism
Modernity
Awakening
Evil
Liberation
Anarchist
Thought
Radicalism
Revolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Philosophy
  • Molecular Biology
  • Religious studies

Cite this

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