The atmospheric partial lifetime of carbon tetrachloride with respect to the global soil sink

Robert C. Rhew, James D Happell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The magnitude of the terrestrial soil sink for atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) remains poorly constrained, with the estimated uncertainty range of CCl4 partial lifetimes between ~110 and 910years. Field observations are sparse, and there are uncertainties in extrapolating these results to the global scale. Here we add to the published CCl4 fluxes with additional field measurements, and we employ a land cover classification scheme based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements that align more closely with the measurement sites to reevaluate the global CCl4 soil sink. We calculate an updated partial lifetime of CCl4 with respect to the soil sink to be 375 (288-536) years, which is 50 to 90% longer than the most recently published best estimates of the soil sink partial lifetime (195 and 245years). This translates into a longer overall atmospheric lifetime estimate, which is more consistent with the observed atmospheric concentration trend and interhemispheric gradient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

carbon tetrachloride
sinks
soils
life (durability)
carbon
soil
Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer
estimates
AVHRR
land cover
trends
gradients

Keywords

  • AVHRR
  • Biome
  • Carbon tetrachloride
  • Soil
  • Tetrachloromethane
  • Tundra

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Geophysics

Cite this

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abstract = "The magnitude of the terrestrial soil sink for atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) remains poorly constrained, with the estimated uncertainty range of CCl4 partial lifetimes between ~110 and 910years. Field observations are sparse, and there are uncertainties in extrapolating these results to the global scale. Here we add to the published CCl4 fluxes with additional field measurements, and we employ a land cover classification scheme based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements that align more closely with the measurement sites to reevaluate the global CCl4 soil sink. We calculate an updated partial lifetime of CCl4 with respect to the soil sink to be 375 (288-536) years, which is 50 to 90{\%} longer than the most recently published best estimates of the soil sink partial lifetime (195 and 245years). This translates into a longer overall atmospheric lifetime estimate, which is more consistent with the observed atmospheric concentration trend and interhemispheric gradient.",
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AB - The magnitude of the terrestrial soil sink for atmospheric carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) remains poorly constrained, with the estimated uncertainty range of CCl4 partial lifetimes between ~110 and 910years. Field observations are sparse, and there are uncertainties in extrapolating these results to the global scale. Here we add to the published CCl4 fluxes with additional field measurements, and we employ a land cover classification scheme based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements that align more closely with the measurement sites to reevaluate the global CCl4 soil sink. We calculate an updated partial lifetime of CCl4 with respect to the soil sink to be 375 (288-536) years, which is 50 to 90% longer than the most recently published best estimates of the soil sink partial lifetime (195 and 245years). This translates into a longer overall atmospheric lifetime estimate, which is more consistent with the observed atmospheric concentration trend and interhemispheric gradient.

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