The associations between basal salivary cortisol and illness symptomatology in chronic fatigue syndrome

Susan Torres-Harding, Matthew Sorenson, Leonard Jason, Nadia Reynolds, Molly Brown, Kevin Maher, Mary Ann Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hypocortisolism has been reported in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), with the significance of this finding to disease etiology unclear. This study examined cortisol levels and their relationships with symptoms in a group of 108 individuals with CFS. CFS symptoms examined included fatigue, pain, sleep difficulties, neurocognitive functioning, and psychiatric status. Alterations in cortisol levels were examined by calculation of mean daily cortisol, and temporal variation in cortisol function was examined by means of a regression slope. Additionally, deviation from expected cortisol diurnal pattern was determined via clinical judgment. Results indicated that fatigue and pain were associated with salivary cortisol levels. In particular, variance from the expected pattern of cortisol was associated with increased levels of fatigue. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-180
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Applied Biobehavioral Research
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The associations between basal salivary cortisol and illness symptomatology in chronic fatigue syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this