The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-Infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression

April Buscher, Michael Mugavero, Andrew O. Westfall, Jeanne Keruly, Richard Moore, Mari Lynn Drainoni, Meg Sullivan, Tracey E. Wilson, Allan E Rodriguez, Lisa Metsch, Lytt Gardner, Gary Marks, Faye Malitz, Thomas P. Giordano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recommendation for the frequency for routine clinical monitoring of persons with well-controlled HIV infection is based on evidence that relies on observed rather than intended follow-up intervals. We sought to determine if the scheduled follow-up interval is associated with subsequent virologic failure. Participants in this 6-clinic retrospective cohort study had an index clinic visit in 2008 and HIV viral load (VL) ≤400 c/mL. Univariate and multivariate tests evaluated if scheduling the next follow-up appointment at 3, 4, or 6 months predicted VL >400 c/mL at 12 months (VF). Among 2171 participants, 66%, 26%, and 8% were scheduled next follow-up visits at 3, 4, and 6 months, respectively. With missing 12-month VL considered VF, 25%, 25%, and 24% of persons scheduled at 3, 4, and 6 months had VF, respectively (p=0.95). Excluding persons with missing 12-month VL, 7.1%, 5.7%, and 4.5% had VF, respectively (p=0.35). Multivariable models yielded nonsignificant odds of VF by scheduled follow-up interval both when missing 12-month VL were considered VF and when persons with missing 12-month VL were excluded. We conclude that clinicians are able to make safe decisions extending follow-up intervals in persons with viral suppression, at least in the short-term.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-466
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

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Viral Load
HIV
Ambulatory Care
HIV Infections
Appointments and Schedules
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Buscher, A., Mugavero, M., Westfall, A. O., Keruly, J., Moore, R., Drainoni, M. L., ... Giordano, T. P. (2013). The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-Infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 27(8), 459-466. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2013.0105

The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-Infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression. / Buscher, April; Mugavero, Michael; Westfall, Andrew O.; Keruly, Jeanne; Moore, Richard; Drainoni, Mari Lynn; Sullivan, Meg; Wilson, Tracey E.; Rodriguez, Allan E; Metsch, Lisa; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Malitz, Faye; Giordano, Thomas P.

In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Vol. 27, No. 8, 01.08.2013, p. 459-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buscher, A, Mugavero, M, Westfall, AO, Keruly, J, Moore, R, Drainoni, ML, Sullivan, M, Wilson, TE, Rodriguez, AE, Metsch, L, Gardner, L, Marks, G, Malitz, F & Giordano, TP 2013, 'The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-Infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression', AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 459-466. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2013.0105
Buscher, April ; Mugavero, Michael ; Westfall, Andrew O. ; Keruly, Jeanne ; Moore, Richard ; Drainoni, Mari Lynn ; Sullivan, Meg ; Wilson, Tracey E. ; Rodriguez, Allan E ; Metsch, Lisa ; Gardner, Lytt ; Marks, Gary ; Malitz, Faye ; Giordano, Thomas P. / The association of clinical follow-up intervals in HIV-Infected persons with viral suppression on subsequent viral suppression. In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 8. pp. 459-466.
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