The association between metacognitions, the obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions and hoarding: A focus on specificity

Kiara R Timpano, Jessica L. Rasmussen, Cornelia Exner, Winfried Rief, Sabine Wilhelm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent year's metacognitive theories - particularly the self-regulatory executive function model proposed by Wells and colleagues - have emerged as a potentially useful perspective from which to extend current cognitive-behavioral models for the mood and anxiety disorders. Metacognitions refer to different beliefs individuals endorse about their thoughts, internal states, and effective coping strategies. Research has linked these attitudes to obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS), yet it remains unclear whether there may be a differential association with the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. The current study aimed to investigate the specific relationships between the OCS dimensions, hoarding, and metacognitions controlling for general distress. The sample (N=160) was comprised of young adults at a large university in Germany. Although all symptom types were significantly linked with the various metacognitions assessed (all p's<.05), a series of linear regression analyses provided support for more nuanced and particular relationships. The analyses conducted allowed us to examine the specificity of any associations, by factoring out any shared variance between the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. Results revealed that (1) positive beliefs about worry were significantly associated with obsessions and ordering; (2) negative beliefs about uncontrollability were significantly associated with obsessions and checking; (3) cognitive confidence was significantly associated with ordering and hoarding; (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts were significantly associated with obsessions, ordering, and hoarding; and (5) cognitive self-consciousness was significantly linked with obsessions and ordering. Additional analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between metacognitions, hoarding-specific beliefs, and hoarding symptoms. Results are discussed from the perspective of current theoretical models of OCD and hoarding and future directions are also highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-194
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Obsessive Behavior
Hoarding
Metacognition
Executive Function
Anxiety Disorders
Consciousness
Mood Disorders
Germany
Young Adult
Linear Models
Theoretical Models
Regression Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • Hoarding
  • Metacognitions
  • Obsessive compulsive symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The association between metacognitions, the obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions and hoarding : A focus on specificity. / Timpano, Kiara R; Rasmussen, Jessica L.; Exner, Cornelia; Rief, Winfried; Wilhelm, Sabine.

In: Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, Vol. 3, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 188-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e1c69c0676814feca9aa415a38e9b489,
title = "The association between metacognitions, the obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions and hoarding: A focus on specificity",
abstract = "In recent year's metacognitive theories - particularly the self-regulatory executive function model proposed by Wells and colleagues - have emerged as a potentially useful perspective from which to extend current cognitive-behavioral models for the mood and anxiety disorders. Metacognitions refer to different beliefs individuals endorse about their thoughts, internal states, and effective coping strategies. Research has linked these attitudes to obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS), yet it remains unclear whether there may be a differential association with the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. The current study aimed to investigate the specific relationships between the OCS dimensions, hoarding, and metacognitions controlling for general distress. The sample (N=160) was comprised of young adults at a large university in Germany. Although all symptom types were significantly linked with the various metacognitions assessed (all p's<.05), a series of linear regression analyses provided support for more nuanced and particular relationships. The analyses conducted allowed us to examine the specificity of any associations, by factoring out any shared variance between the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. Results revealed that (1) positive beliefs about worry were significantly associated with obsessions and ordering; (2) negative beliefs about uncontrollability were significantly associated with obsessions and checking; (3) cognitive confidence was significantly associated with ordering and hoarding; (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts were significantly associated with obsessions, ordering, and hoarding; and (5) cognitive self-consciousness was significantly linked with obsessions and ordering. Additional analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between metacognitions, hoarding-specific beliefs, and hoarding symptoms. Results are discussed from the perspective of current theoretical models of OCD and hoarding and future directions are also highlighted.",
keywords = "Hoarding, Metacognitions, Obsessive compulsive symptoms",
author = "Timpano, {Kiara R} and Rasmussen, {Jessica L.} and Cornelia Exner and Winfried Rief and Sabine Wilhelm",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jocrd.2013.10.001",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "188--194",
journal = "Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders",
issn = "2211-3649",
publisher = "Elsevier Science & Technology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between metacognitions, the obsessive compulsive symptom dimensions and hoarding

T2 - A focus on specificity

AU - Timpano, Kiara R

AU - Rasmussen, Jessica L.

AU - Exner, Cornelia

AU - Rief, Winfried

AU - Wilhelm, Sabine

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - In recent year's metacognitive theories - particularly the self-regulatory executive function model proposed by Wells and colleagues - have emerged as a potentially useful perspective from which to extend current cognitive-behavioral models for the mood and anxiety disorders. Metacognitions refer to different beliefs individuals endorse about their thoughts, internal states, and effective coping strategies. Research has linked these attitudes to obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS), yet it remains unclear whether there may be a differential association with the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. The current study aimed to investigate the specific relationships between the OCS dimensions, hoarding, and metacognitions controlling for general distress. The sample (N=160) was comprised of young adults at a large university in Germany. Although all symptom types were significantly linked with the various metacognitions assessed (all p's<.05), a series of linear regression analyses provided support for more nuanced and particular relationships. The analyses conducted allowed us to examine the specificity of any associations, by factoring out any shared variance between the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. Results revealed that (1) positive beliefs about worry were significantly associated with obsessions and ordering; (2) negative beliefs about uncontrollability were significantly associated with obsessions and checking; (3) cognitive confidence was significantly associated with ordering and hoarding; (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts were significantly associated with obsessions, ordering, and hoarding; and (5) cognitive self-consciousness was significantly linked with obsessions and ordering. Additional analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between metacognitions, hoarding-specific beliefs, and hoarding symptoms. Results are discussed from the perspective of current theoretical models of OCD and hoarding and future directions are also highlighted.

AB - In recent year's metacognitive theories - particularly the self-regulatory executive function model proposed by Wells and colleagues - have emerged as a potentially useful perspective from which to extend current cognitive-behavioral models for the mood and anxiety disorders. Metacognitions refer to different beliefs individuals endorse about their thoughts, internal states, and effective coping strategies. Research has linked these attitudes to obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS), yet it remains unclear whether there may be a differential association with the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. The current study aimed to investigate the specific relationships between the OCS dimensions, hoarding, and metacognitions controlling for general distress. The sample (N=160) was comprised of young adults at a large university in Germany. Although all symptom types were significantly linked with the various metacognitions assessed (all p's<.05), a series of linear regression analyses provided support for more nuanced and particular relationships. The analyses conducted allowed us to examine the specificity of any associations, by factoring out any shared variance between the different OCS dimensions and hoarding. Results revealed that (1) positive beliefs about worry were significantly associated with obsessions and ordering; (2) negative beliefs about uncontrollability were significantly associated with obsessions and checking; (3) cognitive confidence was significantly associated with ordering and hoarding; (4) beliefs about the need to control thoughts were significantly associated with obsessions, ordering, and hoarding; and (5) cognitive self-consciousness was significantly linked with obsessions and ordering. Additional analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between metacognitions, hoarding-specific beliefs, and hoarding symptoms. Results are discussed from the perspective of current theoretical models of OCD and hoarding and future directions are also highlighted.

KW - Hoarding

KW - Metacognitions

KW - Obsessive compulsive symptoms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84900336572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84900336572&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jocrd.2013.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.jocrd.2013.10.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84900336572

VL - 3

SP - 188

EP - 194

JO - Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

JF - Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

SN - 2211-3649

IS - 2

ER -