The American dream revisited: Is it What you want or Why you want it that matters?

Charles S. Carver, Eryn Baird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research found that aspirations to financial success related inversely to self-actualization and that aspirations to community involvement related positively to self-actualization. We argue that diverse reasons can underlie both of these aspirations, leading to more complex predictions. In a sample of 246 participants, we assessed both self-determining and controlling reasons for each class of aspiration, along with endorsements of the aspirations themselves. Initial regression analyses replicated the earlier findings. Subsequent analyses found that endorsement of self-determining reasons for either class of aspiration related positively to self-actualization and that endorsement of controlling reasons for either class of aspiration related inversely to self-actualization. In the analysis involving community involvement, the aspiration itself no longer retained predictive power after the other variables were taken into account. In the analysis involving financial success, however, the aspiration retained an independent predictive role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-292
Number of pages4
JournalPsychological Science
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The American dream revisited: Is it What you want or Why you want it that matters?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this