The adolescent brain

B. J. Casey, Sarah Getz, Adriana Galvan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

954 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by suboptimal decisions and actions that give rise to an increased incidence of unintentional injuries and violence, alcohol and drug abuse, unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Traditional neurobiological and cognitive explanations for adolescent behavior have failed to account for the nonlinear changes in behavior observed during adolescence, relative to childhood and adulthood. This review provides a biologically plausible conceptualization of the neural mechanisms underlying these nonlinear changes in behavior, as a heightened responsiveness to incentives while impulse control is still relatively immature during this period. Recent human imaging and animal studies provide a biological basis for this view, suggesting differential development of limbic reward systems relative to top-down control systems during adolescence relative to childhood and adulthood. This developmental pattern may be exacerbated in those adolescents with a predisposition toward risk-taking, increasing the risk for poor outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)62-77
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Review
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Development
  • Impulsivity
  • Nucleus accumbens
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • Reward
  • Risk-taking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The adolescent brain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this