The actin-severing protein cofilin is downstream of neuregulin signaling and is essential for schwann cell myelination

Nicklaus Sparrow, Maria Elisa Manetti, Marga Bott, Tiffany Fabianac, Alejandra Petrilli, Margaret Longest Bates, Mary B Bunge, Stephen Lambert, Cristina Fernandez-Valle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Myelination is a complex process requiring coordination of directional motility and an increase in glial cell size to generate a multilamellar myelin sheath. Regulation of actin dynamics during myelination is poorly understood. However, it is known that myelin thickness is related to the abundance of neuregulin-1 (NRG1) expressed on the axon surface. Here we identify cofilin1, an actin depolymerizing and severing protein, as a downstream target of NRG1 signaling in rat Schwann cells (SCs). In isolated SCs, NRG1 promotes dephosphorylation of cofilin1 and its upstream regulators, LIM kinase (LIMK) and Slingshot-1 phosphatase (SSH1), leading to cofilin1 activation and recruitment to the leading edge of the plasma membrane. These changes are associated with rapid membrane expansion yielding a 35-50% increase in SC size within 30 min. Cofilin1-deficient SCs increase phosphorylation of ErbB2, ERK, focal adhesion kinase, and paxillin in response to NRG1, but fail to increase in size possibly due to stabilization of unusually long focal adhesions. Cofilin1-deficient SCs cocultured with sensory neurons do not myelinate. Ultrastructural analysis reveals that they unsuccessfully segregate or engage axons and form only patchy basal lamina. After 48 h of coculturing with neurons, cofilin1-deficient SCs do not align or elongate on axons and often form adhesions with the underlying substrate. This study identifies cofilin1 and its upstream regulators,LIMKand SSH1, as end targets of a NRG1 signaling pathway and demonstrates that cofilin1 is necessary for dynamic changes in the cytoskeleton needed for axon engagement and myelination by SCs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5284-5297
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume32
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2012

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Neuregulins
Actin Depolymerizing Factors
Schwann Cells
Neuregulin-1
Actins
Axons
Myelin Sheath
Cell Size
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Lim Kinases
Paxillin
Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Focal Adhesions
Sensory Receptor Cells
Cytoskeleton
Basement Membrane
Neuroglia
Phosphorylation
Cell Membrane
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sparrow, N., Manetti, M. E., Bott, M., Fabianac, T., Petrilli, A., Bates, M. L., ... Fernandez-Valle, C. (2012). The actin-severing protein cofilin is downstream of neuregulin signaling and is essential for schwann cell myelination. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(15), 5284-5297. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6207-11.2012

The actin-severing protein cofilin is downstream of neuregulin signaling and is essential for schwann cell myelination. / Sparrow, Nicklaus; Manetti, Maria Elisa; Bott, Marga; Fabianac, Tiffany; Petrilli, Alejandra; Bates, Margaret Longest; Bunge, Mary B; Lambert, Stephen; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 32, No. 15, 11.04.2012, p. 5284-5297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sparrow, N, Manetti, ME, Bott, M, Fabianac, T, Petrilli, A, Bates, ML, Bunge, MB, Lambert, S & Fernandez-Valle, C 2012, 'The actin-severing protein cofilin is downstream of neuregulin signaling and is essential for schwann cell myelination', Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 15, pp. 5284-5297. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6207-11.2012
Sparrow, Nicklaus ; Manetti, Maria Elisa ; Bott, Marga ; Fabianac, Tiffany ; Petrilli, Alejandra ; Bates, Margaret Longest ; Bunge, Mary B ; Lambert, Stephen ; Fernandez-Valle, Cristina. / The actin-severing protein cofilin is downstream of neuregulin signaling and is essential for schwann cell myelination. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2012 ; Vol. 32, No. 15. pp. 5284-5297.
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AU - Petrilli, Alejandra

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