TEP on the tide in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus): Effects of progressively changing salinity and prior acclimation to intermediate or cycling salinity

Chris Wood, Martin Grosell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transepithelial potentials (TEP) were measured in killifish, acclimated to freshwater (FW), seawater (SW), 33% SW or cycling salinities relevant to tidal cycles in an estuary, and subsequently subjected to salinity changes in progressive or random order. Random compared to progressive salinity changes in an upward or downward direction in FW- and SW-acclimated fish, respectively, did not greatly influence responses to salinity change. Fish acclimated to SW or 33% SW as well as those acclimated to cycling salinities behaved similarly (TEP more positive than +15 mV in 100% SW, decreasing to ∼0 mV at 20-40% SW, and more negative than -30 mV in FW). In contrast, FW-acclimated fish displayed a less pronounced TEP response to salinity (0 mV in FW through 20% SW, increasing thereafter to values more positive than +10 mV at 100% SW). We conclude that when evaluated under estuarine tidal conditions, the killifish gill exhibits adaptive electrical characteristics, opposing Na+ loss at low salinity and favouring Na+ extrusion at high salinity, changes explained at least in part by the Cl- to Na+ permeability ratio. Thus animals living in the estuaries can move to lower and higher salinities for short periods with little physiological disturbance, but this ability is lost after acclimation to FW.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-467
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
Volume179
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009

Keywords

  • Diffusion potential
  • Electrogenic potential
  • Estuaries
  • Gill permeability
  • P/P ratio
  • Salinity
  • Tidal cycle
  • Transepithelial potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology

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