Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients: a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy

Gabriel Levy Hara, Souha S. Kanj, Leonardo Pagani, Lilian Abbo, Andrea Endimiani, Heiman F L Wertheim, Carlos Amábile-Cuevas, Pierre Tattevin, Shaheen Mehtar, Fernando Lopes Cardoso, Serhat Unal, Ian Gould

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Antibiotic Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society for Chemotherapy propose ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospital settings. (i) Get appropriate microbiological samples before antibiotic administration and carefully interpret the results: in the absence of clinical signs of infection, colonisation rarely requires antimicrobial treatment. (ii) Avoid the use of antibiotics to ‘treat’ fever: use them to treat infections, and investigate the root cause of fever prior to starting treatment. (iii) Start empirical antibiotic treatment after taking cultures, tailoring it to the site of infection, risk factors for multidrug-resistant bacteria, and the local microbiology and susceptibility patterns. (iv) Prescribe drugs at their optimal dosing and for an appropriate duration, adapted to each clinical situation and patient characteristics. (v) Use antibiotic combinations only where the current evidence suggests some benefit. (vi) When possible, avoid antibiotics with a higher likelihood of promoting drug resistance or hospital-acquired infections, or use them only as a last resort. (vii) Drain the infected foci quickly and remove all potentially or proven infected devices: control the infection source. (viii) Always try to de-escalate/streamline antibiotic treatment according to the clinical situation and the microbiological results. (ix) Stop unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics once the absence of infection is likely. And (x) Do not work alone: set up local teams with an infectious diseases specialist, clinical microbiologist, hospital pharmacist, infection control practitioner or hospital epidemiologist, and comply with hospital antibiotic policies and guidelines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-246
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Therapy
Cross Infection
Infection
Infection Control Practitioners
Fever
Therapeutics
Infection Control
Microbial Drug Resistance
Microbiology
Pharmacists
Drug Resistance
Communicable Diseases
Guidelines
Bacteria
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Antimicrobial stewardship
  • Combination therapy
  • Prudent use of antibiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients : a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy. / Levy Hara, Gabriel; Kanj, Souha S.; Pagani, Leonardo; Abbo, Lilian; Endimiani, Andrea; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos; Tattevin, Pierre; Mehtar, Shaheen; Lopes Cardoso, Fernando; Unal, Serhat; Gould, Ian.

In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 239-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Levy Hara, Gabriel ; Kanj, Souha S. ; Pagani, Leonardo ; Abbo, Lilian ; Endimiani, Andrea ; Wertheim, Heiman F L ; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos ; Tattevin, Pierre ; Mehtar, Shaheen ; Lopes Cardoso, Fernando ; Unal, Serhat ; Gould, Ian. / Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients : a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy. In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents. 2016 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 239-246.
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