Temporal Relationship Between Life Events and Two Illness Measures: A Cross-Lagged Panel Analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stressful life events were correlated with two separate illness measures among naval submarine school students. The two illness measures were self-reported health symptoms, and illness recorded in the subjects' medical files. Life events, self-reported symptoms, and medical record illnesses were separated into two time blocks and subjected to a cross-lagged panel analysis in order to assess the temporal relationships among them. A significant positive relationship was shown between negative life events experienced 7-12 months prior to testing and medical record illnesses experienced 0-6 months prior to testing. A comparable relationship was not found for negative events and self-reported symptoms. The results support the view that negative life events increase susceptibility to actual illness onset. They also question the accuracy of self-report measures of illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-26
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Human Stress
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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