Telephone medicine in a southern university private practice

R. E. Morrison, Kristopher Arheart, W. Rimner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Routine, office-hour, patient-directed telephone calls to a general and multispecialty-university, private-practice clinic were surveyed. The calls were short, averaging 1 to 2 minutes. Two-thirds of the calls concerned medications, and 13% were for new medical problems. Patients called with a variety of chronic conditions and less commonly for new problems. Medications such as antihypertensives, antibiotics, and diuretics were prescribed and refilled. The role of telephone medicine in providing access in some managed- care settings is yet to be studied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-159
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume306
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Private Practice
Telephone
Medicine
Managed Care Programs
Diuretics
Antihypertensive Agents
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Office practice
  • Patient access
  • Telephone medicine
  • Triage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Morrison, R. E., Arheart, K., & Rimner, W. (1993). Telephone medicine in a southern university private practice. American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 306(3), 157-159.

Telephone medicine in a southern university private practice. / Morrison, R. E.; Arheart, Kristopher; Rimner, W.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 306, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 157-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, RE, Arheart, K & Rimner, W 1993, 'Telephone medicine in a southern university private practice', American Journal of the Medical Sciences, vol. 306, no. 3, pp. 157-159.
Morrison, R. E. ; Arheart, Kristopher ; Rimner, W. / Telephone medicine in a southern university private practice. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 1993 ; Vol. 306, No. 3. pp. 157-159.
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