Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for readmission for mental diseases and disorders

Joshua Parreco, Nawara Alawa, Rishi Rattan, Jun Tashiro, Juan E Sola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Most studies of readmission after trauma are limited to single institutions or single states. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for readmission after trauma for mental illness including readmissions to different hospitals across the United States. Materials and methods: The Nationwide Readmission Database for 2013 and 2014 was queried for all patients aged 13 to 64 y with a nonelective admission for trauma and a nonelective readmission within 30 d. Multivariable logistic regression was performed for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. Results: During the study period, 53,402 patients were readmitted within 30 d after trauma. The most common major diagnostic category on readmission was mental diseases and disorders (12.1%). The age group with the highest percentage of readmissions for mental diseases and disorders was 13 to 17 y (38%). On multivariable regression, the teenage group was also the most likely to be readmitted for mental diseases and disorders compared to 18-44 y (odds ratio [OR] 0.45, P < 0.01) and 45-64 y (OR 0.24, P < 0.01). Other high-risk comorbidities included HIV infection (OR 2.4, P < 0.01), psychosis (OR 2.2, P < 0.01), drug (OR 2.0, P < 0.01), and alcohol (OR 1.4, P < 0.01) abuse. Conclusions: Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for hospital readmission for mental illness. Efforts to reduce these admissions should be targeted toward individuals with high-risk comorbidities such as HIV infection, psychosis, and substance abuse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)415-421
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume232
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Mental Disorders
Odds Ratio
Wounds and Injuries
Psychotic Disorders
HIV Infections
Comorbidity
Patient Readmission
Substance-Related Disorders
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Alcohols
Databases
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Mental disease
  • Mental disorder
  • Readmission
  • Teenage
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. / Parreco, Joshua; Alawa, Nawara; Rattan, Rishi; Tashiro, Jun; Sola, Juan E.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 232, 01.12.2018, p. 415-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parreco, Joshua ; Alawa, Nawara ; Rattan, Rishi ; Tashiro, Jun ; Sola, Juan E. / Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2018 ; Vol. 232. pp. 415-421.
@article{9c9784bed50c445bb7bf0056e83bd7b4,
title = "Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for readmission for mental diseases and disorders",
abstract = "Background: Most studies of readmission after trauma are limited to single institutions or single states. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for readmission after trauma for mental illness including readmissions to different hospitals across the United States. Materials and methods: The Nationwide Readmission Database for 2013 and 2014 was queried for all patients aged 13 to 64 y with a nonelective admission for trauma and a nonelective readmission within 30 d. Multivariable logistic regression was performed for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. Results: During the study period, 53,402 patients were readmitted within 30 d after trauma. The most common major diagnostic category on readmission was mental diseases and disorders (12.1{\%}). The age group with the highest percentage of readmissions for mental diseases and disorders was 13 to 17 y (38{\%}). On multivariable regression, the teenage group was also the most likely to be readmitted for mental diseases and disorders compared to 18-44 y (odds ratio [OR] 0.45, P < 0.01) and 45-64 y (OR 0.24, P < 0.01). Other high-risk comorbidities included HIV infection (OR 2.4, P < 0.01), psychosis (OR 2.2, P < 0.01), drug (OR 2.0, P < 0.01), and alcohol (OR 1.4, P < 0.01) abuse. Conclusions: Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for hospital readmission for mental illness. Efforts to reduce these admissions should be targeted toward individuals with high-risk comorbidities such as HIV infection, psychosis, and substance abuse.",
keywords = "Mental disease, Mental disorder, Readmission, Teenage, Trauma",
author = "Joshua Parreco and Nawara Alawa and Rishi Rattan and Jun Tashiro and Sola, {Juan E}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jss.2018.06.065",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "232",
pages = "415--421",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for readmission for mental diseases and disorders

AU - Parreco, Joshua

AU - Alawa, Nawara

AU - Rattan, Rishi

AU - Tashiro, Jun

AU - Sola, Juan E

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Background: Most studies of readmission after trauma are limited to single institutions or single states. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for readmission after trauma for mental illness including readmissions to different hospitals across the United States. Materials and methods: The Nationwide Readmission Database for 2013 and 2014 was queried for all patients aged 13 to 64 y with a nonelective admission for trauma and a nonelective readmission within 30 d. Multivariable logistic regression was performed for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. Results: During the study period, 53,402 patients were readmitted within 30 d after trauma. The most common major diagnostic category on readmission was mental diseases and disorders (12.1%). The age group with the highest percentage of readmissions for mental diseases and disorders was 13 to 17 y (38%). On multivariable regression, the teenage group was also the most likely to be readmitted for mental diseases and disorders compared to 18-44 y (odds ratio [OR] 0.45, P < 0.01) and 45-64 y (OR 0.24, P < 0.01). Other high-risk comorbidities included HIV infection (OR 2.4, P < 0.01), psychosis (OR 2.2, P < 0.01), drug (OR 2.0, P < 0.01), and alcohol (OR 1.4, P < 0.01) abuse. Conclusions: Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for hospital readmission for mental illness. Efforts to reduce these admissions should be targeted toward individuals with high-risk comorbidities such as HIV infection, psychosis, and substance abuse.

AB - Background: Most studies of readmission after trauma are limited to single institutions or single states. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk factors for readmission after trauma for mental illness including readmissions to different hospitals across the United States. Materials and methods: The Nationwide Readmission Database for 2013 and 2014 was queried for all patients aged 13 to 64 y with a nonelective admission for trauma and a nonelective readmission within 30 d. Multivariable logistic regression was performed for readmission for mental diseases and disorders. Results: During the study period, 53,402 patients were readmitted within 30 d after trauma. The most common major diagnostic category on readmission was mental diseases and disorders (12.1%). The age group with the highest percentage of readmissions for mental diseases and disorders was 13 to 17 y (38%). On multivariable regression, the teenage group was also the most likely to be readmitted for mental diseases and disorders compared to 18-44 y (odds ratio [OR] 0.45, P < 0.01) and 45-64 y (OR 0.24, P < 0.01). Other high-risk comorbidities included HIV infection (OR 2.4, P < 0.01), psychosis (OR 2.2, P < 0.01), drug (OR 2.0, P < 0.01), and alcohol (OR 1.4, P < 0.01) abuse. Conclusions: Teenage trauma patients are at increased risk for hospital readmission for mental illness. Efforts to reduce these admissions should be targeted toward individuals with high-risk comorbidities such as HIV infection, psychosis, and substance abuse.

KW - Mental disease

KW - Mental disorder

KW - Readmission

KW - Teenage

KW - Trauma

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050093687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85050093687&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jss.2018.06.065

DO - 10.1016/j.jss.2018.06.065

M3 - Article

C2 - 30463750

AN - SCOPUS:85050093687

VL - 232

SP - 415

EP - 421

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

ER -