Targeting the HIV-infected brain to improve ischemic stroke outcome

Luc Bertrand, Fannie Méroth, Marie Tournebize, Ana Rachel Leda, Enze Sun, Michal J Toborek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HIV-associated cerebrovascular events remain highly prevalent even in the current era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesize that low-level HIV replication and associated inflammation endure despite antiretroviral treatment and affect ischemic stroke severity and outcomes. Using the EcoHIV infection model and the middle cerebral artery occlusion as the ischemic stroke model in mice, we present in vivo analysis of the relationship between HIV and stroke outcome. EcoHIV infection increases infarct size and negatively impacts tissue and functional recovery. Ischemic stroke also results in an increase in EcoHIV presence in the affected regions, suggesting post-stroke reactivation that magnifies pro-inflammatory status. Importantly, ART with a high CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) is more beneficial than low CPE treatment in limiting tissue injury and accelerating post-stroke recovery. These results provide potential insight for treatment of HIV-infected patients that are at risk of developing cerebrovascular disease, such as ischemic stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2009
JournalNature communications
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

human immunodeficiency virus
strokes
brain
Brain
Stroke
HIV
Tissue
Recovery
infectious diseases
therapy
penetration
recovery
Cerebrovascular Disorders
occlusion
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Therapeutics
arteries
Infection
mice
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Targeting the HIV-infected brain to improve ischemic stroke outcome. / Bertrand, Luc; Méroth, Fannie; Tournebize, Marie; Leda, Ana Rachel; Sun, Enze; Toborek, Michal J.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2009, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bertrand, Luc ; Méroth, Fannie ; Tournebize, Marie ; Leda, Ana Rachel ; Sun, Enze ; Toborek, Michal J. / Targeting the HIV-infected brain to improve ischemic stroke outcome. In: Nature communications. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
@article{8e5303043ae4403a94c58223d9daa56d,
title = "Targeting the HIV-infected brain to improve ischemic stroke outcome",
abstract = "HIV-associated cerebrovascular events remain highly prevalent even in the current era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesize that low-level HIV replication and associated inflammation endure despite antiretroviral treatment and affect ischemic stroke severity and outcomes. Using the EcoHIV infection model and the middle cerebral artery occlusion as the ischemic stroke model in mice, we present in vivo analysis of the relationship between HIV and stroke outcome. EcoHIV infection increases infarct size and negatively impacts tissue and functional recovery. Ischemic stroke also results in an increase in EcoHIV presence in the affected regions, suggesting post-stroke reactivation that magnifies pro-inflammatory status. Importantly, ART with a high CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) is more beneficial than low CPE treatment in limiting tissue injury and accelerating post-stroke recovery. These results provide potential insight for treatment of HIV-infected patients that are at risk of developing cerebrovascular disease, such as ischemic stroke.",
author = "Luc Bertrand and Fannie M{\'e}roth and Marie Tournebize and Leda, {Ana Rachel} and Enze Sun and Toborek, {Michal J}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41467-019-10046-x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Targeting the HIV-infected brain to improve ischemic stroke outcome

AU - Bertrand, Luc

AU - Méroth, Fannie

AU - Tournebize, Marie

AU - Leda, Ana Rachel

AU - Sun, Enze

AU - Toborek, Michal J

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - HIV-associated cerebrovascular events remain highly prevalent even in the current era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesize that low-level HIV replication and associated inflammation endure despite antiretroviral treatment and affect ischemic stroke severity and outcomes. Using the EcoHIV infection model and the middle cerebral artery occlusion as the ischemic stroke model in mice, we present in vivo analysis of the relationship between HIV and stroke outcome. EcoHIV infection increases infarct size and negatively impacts tissue and functional recovery. Ischemic stroke also results in an increase in EcoHIV presence in the affected regions, suggesting post-stroke reactivation that magnifies pro-inflammatory status. Importantly, ART with a high CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) is more beneficial than low CPE treatment in limiting tissue injury and accelerating post-stroke recovery. These results provide potential insight for treatment of HIV-infected patients that are at risk of developing cerebrovascular disease, such as ischemic stroke.

AB - HIV-associated cerebrovascular events remain highly prevalent even in the current era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesize that low-level HIV replication and associated inflammation endure despite antiretroviral treatment and affect ischemic stroke severity and outcomes. Using the EcoHIV infection model and the middle cerebral artery occlusion as the ischemic stroke model in mice, we present in vivo analysis of the relationship between HIV and stroke outcome. EcoHIV infection increases infarct size and negatively impacts tissue and functional recovery. Ischemic stroke also results in an increase in EcoHIV presence in the affected regions, suggesting post-stroke reactivation that magnifies pro-inflammatory status. Importantly, ART with a high CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) is more beneficial than low CPE treatment in limiting tissue injury and accelerating post-stroke recovery. These results provide potential insight for treatment of HIV-infected patients that are at risk of developing cerebrovascular disease, such as ischemic stroke.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065181269&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065181269&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-019-10046-x

DO - 10.1038/s41467-019-10046-x

M3 - Article

C2 - 31043599

AN - SCOPUS:85065181269

VL - 10

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

IS - 1

M1 - 2009

ER -