Targeting family functioning, acculturative stress, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption for obesity prevention: findings from the Hispanic community children’s health study/study of Latino youth

Roger Figueroa, Carmen R. Isasi, Krista M. Perreira, Amanda C. McClain, Linda C. Gallo, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Alan M. Delamater, Martha Daviglus, Linda Van Horn, Josiemer Mattei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Maintaining a bond with one’s family as well coping with stress while acculturating to the US may protect Hispanic/Latino youth from increased sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) consumption, which heightens the risk for overweight and obesity. This study aims to examine associations between acculturative stress, family functioning, and SSB consumption by acculturation status among U.S. Hispanic/Latino youth. Methods: With cross-sectional data on 1465 youth 8-16y (49.6% females) participating in the Hispanic Community Children’s Health Study/Study of Latino Youth, we classified youths into four acculturation groups – assimilated, integrated, marginalized/separated, and unclassified. SSB consumption was assessed through two 24-h diet recalls and defined as intake frequency of soda, fruit juice, sweetened soft and fruit drinks. Multi-group path regression models were used to test associations of Hispanic/Latino youth’ acculturative stress and family functioning with SSB consumption, as well as the moderating role of acculturation status. Results: When controlling for age, sex, and study site, acculturative stress (β = − 0.13, p = 0.01) was inversely associated with SSB, and poor family functioning (β = 0.11, p = 0.07) was only marginally associated with SSB consumption among youth classified as assimilated but not among youth classified as integrated, marginalized/separated, or unclassified. Conclusions: A socio-ecological perspective that incorporates the role of key acculturation-related factors across multiple levels may aid efforts to identify mechanisms that influence the relationship between acculturation status and diet among Hispanic/Latino youth and their families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1546
JournalBMC public health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Adolescence
  • Family functioning
  • Hispanic/Latino
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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