Targeted bone marrow radioablation with 153Samarium-Lexidronam promotes allogeneic hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific immunologic hyporesponsiveness

Luca Inverardi, Elina Linetsky, Antonello Pileggi, R. Damaris Molano, Aldo Serafini, Giovanni Paganelli, Camillo Ricordi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Transplantation tolerance, defined as acceptance of a graft by an otherwise fully immunocompetent host, has been an elusive goal. Although robust tolerance has been achieved by the induction of stable hematopoietic chimerism after bone marrow transplantation, lethal or sublethal radiation conditioning used to induce long-term chimerism precludes its clinical use. We studied whether targeted delivery of radiation to bone marrow could allow for bone marrow cell (BMC) engraftment, chimerism, and donor-specific tolerance in the absence of the side effects associated with external irradiation. Methods. We administered a radioactive bone-seeking compound ( 153Samarium-Lexidronam, Quadramet, Berlex Laboratories, Wayne, NJ) together with transient T-cell costimulatory blockade to recipient mice. Allogeneic BMCs were given 7 or 14 days after preconditioning. Costimulatory blockade was obtained by the use of an anti-CD154 antibody for 4 weeks. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. Mice then received donor-specific and third-party skin grafts. Graft survival was analyzed with mechanisms of donor-specific hyporesponsiveness. Results. High levels of stable chimerism across an allogeneic barrier were achieved in mice by a single administration of 153Samarium-Lexidronam, transient T-cell costimulatory blockade, and BMC transplantation. A large percentage of chimeric animals retained donor-derived skin grafts for more than 120 days without requiring additional immunosuppression, suggesting that harsh cytotoxic preconditioning is not necessary to achieve stable chimerism and donor-specific hyporesponsiveness. Analysis of the T-cell repertoire in chimeras indicates T-cell deletional mechanisms. Conclusions. These data broaden the potential use of BMC transplantation for tolerance induction and argue for its potential in treating autoimmune diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-655
Number of pages9
JournalTransplantation
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

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